GNOME 2.18 is on your way, baby.

been working on writing (hmm… or “mashing up”?) guidelines for proposing new modules for the GNOME desktop, and translated for the first time a .po file, just to check out something totally new. :-)
sent a last showstopper review for GNOME 2.18, also nagged some folks on bugs that are on the best way to become blockers. GNOME 2.18 looks like it will become pretty sane, i only hope that i haven’t ignored something important…
also prepared another small wishlist for nautilus (nautilus 2.16 has been one of the major problematic modules in bugzilla – very few developers but a flood of reports, many of them looking pretty much the same but not exactly, and nearly all of them without any debugging symbols. i think that nearly a dozen really problematic crashers have been fixed in the last months thanks to alex, and i hope that gnome 2.18 will be a quiet time for nautilus at the bug front – because i’d really like to move on to other fields.)

finally set up a list of major issues that have been fixed in the last months and sent it to the distributor-list, so it’s easier for vendors with a backport-only policy to identify patches that are worth getting backported into downstream, and to hopefully reduce workload on the bugsquad team. i still don’t know if this is a useful approach, but after having a chat with ubuntu’s seb128 about this problem (read: “demystifying my perceptions of the number of ubuntu package maintainers”), it seems really useful to share the information with all of the GNOME distros out there, and to do this on a regular basis, combined with taking a look at the showstoppers.

and i’m wondering if either danilo or christian are around, because some string freeze break requests on the gnome-i18n list have been waiting for an approval/rejection. don’t want to yield stress, just wondering…

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