Archive for August, 2013

Bugzilla Tips (XI): Reports: Tickets closed last week by resolution

Friday, August 30th, 2013

This posting is part of a series on small and sometimes not-so-easy-to-discover functionality in Bugzilla that makes developers’ and users’ lifes more comfortable. It’s based on conversations with users and developers in the last months.

This episode goes deeper into Creating reports and tables and Bugzilla’s Advanced Search.

Three weeks ago a development team asked how to get the number of Bugzilla tickets closed in the last seven days by some resolutions (e.g. FIXED, WONTFIX, INVALID, WORKSFORME) while not being interested in the number of tickets closed as DUPLICATE or LATER.

Another usecase for tabular reports in Bugzilla: The vertical axis will display the components which the team maintains and the horizontal axis will display the bug report resolutions:

bugzilla-closedstats1

We manually selected the components of the team in the “Components” list (keep the Control key pressed to make a multi-selection), and selected all resolutions which should be listed in the bug report (see here for the meaning of the “—” resolution). Keep in mind that these resolutions only refer to the current status of the bug reports.

bugzilla-closedstats2

As we only want to know the number of tickets who were resolved in the last week, we need to query for changes of the resolution. This is where the Custom Search comes into play which allows logical combinations of conditions. For our example:

bugzilla-closedstats3

The generated report looks like this:

bugzilla-closedstats4

Though we chose to include INVALID and WONTFIX resolutions in the search criteria above, the table does not have INVALID and WONTFIX columns because no tickets were closed with that resolution in the last week. Similarly there is no row for the “CLDR” component chosen in the search criteria above because no CLDR ticket was resolved in the last week.

Above example explains how to exclude statuses from the table which you are not interested in. If you want all resolutions displayed in the table anyway (and as setting a resolution requires changing the bug status to RESOLVED), you might already guess that there is an easier way by using “Search By Change History”:

bugzilla-closedstats5

Now in case you wonder why setting the resolutions via the custom search is not sufficient and why it is also required to set the current resolution in the “Product / Component / Status / Resolution” lists above as search criteria: It avoids including tickets which already got reopened in the meantime.

If the numbers are slightly different than your expectations, note that until Bugzilla version 4.2, -7d refers to the beginning of the day in the timezone that Bugzilla is set to, not to the last 168 hours. This has changed in Bugzilla 4.4 though, -1d refers to the last -24h while -1ds refers to the start of the day.

Bugzilla Tips (X): Triage helper tools: Greasemonkey scripts

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

This posting is part of a series on small and sometimes not-so-easy-to-discover functionality in Bugzilla that makes developers’ and users’ lifes more comfortable. It’s based on conversations with users and developers in the last months.

If you read a lot of Bugzilla tickets per day you run into some recurring situations. For example, a bug report might miss sufficient information and you want to point its reporter to a wikipage which explains how to write good bug reports, or you clean up older rotting tickets without enough information and while closing them you want to explain to the reporter why you close the report.

In such situations, having some one-click stock answers (or “canned responses” as others call them) can come in handy in order to save time. I’ve been using several Greasemonkey scripts in my Firefox browser over those years. The two Javascript files which I use in Wikimedia Bugzilla are available to everybody in the code repository. They can be checked out by running the command git clone https://gerrit.wikimedia.org/r/p/wikimedia/bugzilla/triagescripts.git
To use them in Firefox, one has to install Greasemonkey, visit the Git web interface of the repository with Firefox and click the “Raw” links. An installation dialog will open. Note that these scripts only work if you have canconfirm and editbugs permissions in Bugzilla.

This is how it looks after installing the scripts:

bugzilla-triagehelpers-stockanswers

In the picture above, I clicked the “[Close:WorksForMe]” answer. An explanatory command (which also automatically picks up the name of the reporter) is added and the status “RESOLVED WORKSFORME” is set.

As time goes by I’ve added more functionality for my convenience, mostly links to places which are related to functionality exposed in the Bugzilla interface:

bugzilla-triagehelpers

Most useful to me is

  • coloring reporters based on their email addresses (I might spend less attention on a report created by an established developer or employee than a newcomer),
  • coloring the component (MediaWiki has hundreds of extensions, and extensions which are deployed on Wikimedia servers might receive more attention than a non-deployed 3rd party extension),
  • a link to search for other reports created by the same user, and
  • a link to a graph of the priority distribution of tickets for the component (to check how realistically priorities are set – if you only have open tickets with high priority for your component, then something is wrong).

While the code of these Greasemonkey scripts would welcome some cleanup and refactoring, it works for me. Plus today I finally introduced a bunch of boolean variables at the top of the scripts so users can easily define which functionality s/he wants to enable (or not). You are welcome to give it a try (and provide patches if you feel like hacking away).

Of course all this functionality could also be added to the Bugzilla code on the server but I do not want to clutter the Bugzilla user interface even more for everybody by default.
Note that there is also a “proper” upstream Bugzilla extension called Canned Comments available since May 2012 which I have not played with yet.

Colors!

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Save the money for LSD when you can have gnome-shell with a KMS kernel bug!

GNOME Shell with interesting colors

Bugzilla Tips (IX): Excluding less important reports from search results

Friday, August 16th, 2013

This posting is part of a series on small and sometimes not-so-easy-to-discover functionality in Bugzilla that makes developers’ and users’ lifes more comfortable. It’s based on conversations with users and developers in the last months.

Sometimes I’d like to exclude certain bug reports from the search results in Bugzilla.
The most common case is excluding enhancement requests (in order to only get “real” bugs) and excluding lowest and unprioritized priorities (the available values for priorities and severity may differ in other Bugzilla instances), to only have more important stuff listed in the results.

Go to Bugzilla’s Advanced Search and select the product/component that you are interested in, as always. In the “Detailed Bug Information” section, select all values which you do not want to exclude from the Severity and Priority fields:

Selecting Priority and Severity values

Bugzilla Tips (VIII):Using flags to track branches and versions

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

This posting is part of a series on small and sometimes not-so-easy-to-discover functionality in Bugzilla that makes developers’ and users’ lifes more comfortable. It’s based on conversations with users and developers in the last months.

This episode covers an aspect of release management: Branches.
Bugzilla’s support for tracking bugs and bug fixes in several branches/versions has been notoriously bad.

I have seen two ways how software projects using Bugzilla handle this: One way is to clone bug reports and use the Version and Target Milestone fields strictly. Hence one bug report only affects one branch (version), and the very same bug is handled in a separate bug report for a different branch/version.

Another way is to use flags. Flags can have four states:

  • ?: Somebody requested a decision.
  • -: The request was refused.
  • +: The request was approved.
  • By default the field is empty, and no decision is required / the bug report is not affected.

Flags in Wikimedia Bugzilla:

Tracking-branches-flags-wm

Still, using flags requires agreements on workflows, for example after setting “+” (approved) the bug report should only be closed as RESOLVED FIXED once the fix has actually been merged into the branch.

Since version 4.4, bugmail includes an “X-Bugzilla-Flags” email header which allows filtering mail on it. Furthermore, in contrast to keywords, flags can be configured to automatically notify certain email addresses whenever such a flag request is set.

Mozilla Bugzilla even has a more complicated custom implementation of this which covers both testing whether a version is affected and whether a version has received a bug fix, allowing more than the four states mentioned above:

Tracking-branches-flags-moz

If you use a different approach to track branches in Bugzilla, let me know in the comments!