Update to GTK on Win32

hacking Comments Off

Brad Taylor and I have been working on getting GTK to cross-compile for Win32 on his system also. We found a couple places where my process only worked for my system but we fixed them and I’ve updated my docs so that hopefully anyone can reproduce this.

I’ve posted my instructions online now, because a number of people contacted me after my last post about this and were interested in building GTK for Win32 also. So, I would like to hear from people and find out if this worked for others. If you have problems with it on your system and find a solution, I can add that to the docs.

I also want to move this over to live.gnome.org sometime. That seems like a more appropriate place for it. I’ll try to do that later this week.

Once again, a big thanks to Tor Lillqvist and everyone on #gtk+ who helped me with getting this stuff going.

Building GTK on Win32

hacking Comments Off

So I sat down and invested some time into building GTK 2.10 on Windows today, with help from Tor. I think Tor usually builds it on Windows using MSYS or Cygwin or something, but I managed to cross-compile from Linux and it seemed to sort of work.

There isn’t really any good and up-to-date documentation online for how to build GTK on Win32, so I made a log of every step of my process so that this can (hopefully) be reproduced by others. We’re never going to get any of the Win32-related bugs fixed if nobody can build it. :) So my next step is to start over from scratch in a different target directory and turn my log into something more concise (there are a lot of trial and error steps in my log where something didn’t work and I had to go back and try something else). And there are a few steps where I had to hack configure scripts directly, and I’d like to be able to figure out real solutions to those steps.

Sinfonia Concertante

music Comments Off

So I went to tonight’s (Saturday’s) Fort Worth Symphony concert because it included the Mozart Sinfonia Concertante with violist Roberto Diaz. It was very good, and I was happy I went. This was actually my first time to hear a live performance of that piece with orchestra (the only other time I think I have ever heard it live was when a couple Peabody students played it).

So the violinist in this concert was someone named James Ehnes, who I had never heard of before. I thought he was pretty good but his interpretation was pretty stiff. He played all the
notes and everything, but it lacked a lot of musicality I thought.

Roberto, on the other hand, was very expressive. His rhythm was not rigid, and he was very lively and energetic. My only complaint about the performance in general was that I felt like the first two movements were far too fast, and Roberto seemed to be pushing it somewhat. I’m not sure if that is entirely true, but of the two soloists I felt that he was sort of the one in control. I also thought the last movement seemed ever so slightly too fast, but it’s marked presto so I guess you can go as fast as you want. I wouldn’t say it felt out of control or anything, it just felt hurried.

Still, this was a very nice performance and I am certainly glad that I went to it. I think today was the only day that they were playing this program, otherwise I probably would have gone to hear them tomorrow as well.

Medsphere

General Comments Off

So I went out to California the last two weeks to start my new job, and I got to finally meet Cesar from #mono. Anthony Taranto, Peter Johanson, and Brad Taylor also work there. It was a really fun trip, everyone was fun. I almost went to see SoaP with the rest of the company, but my plane left too early on Friday so I missed out.

Psycho Killer Raccoons Terrorize Olympia

General Comments Off

Seriously.
It’s true
.

Viola "del Crocifisso"

music Comments Off

I was listening to Luigi Alberto Bianchi’s recording of the Paganini viola sonata a few days ago, and decided to Google his viola, the 1595 Brothers Amati “del Crocifisso”. It was stolen in 1980 and as far as I knew never recovered, but I was surprised to find an article from April that claimed the instrument was recovered in Milan, about 26 years after it was lost.