Watching iView with Rygel

One of the features of Rygel that I found most interesting was the external media server support.  It looked like an easy way to publish information on the network without implementing a full UPnP/DLNA media server (i.e. handling the UPnP multicast traffic, transcoding to a format that the remote system can handle, etc).

As a small test, I put together a server that exposes the ABC‘s iView service to UPnP media renderers.  The result is a bit rough around the edges, but the basic functionality works.  The source can be grabbed using Bazaar:

bzr branch lp:~jamesh/+junk/rygel-iview

It needs Python, Twisted, the Python bindings for D-Bus and rtmpdump to run.  The program exports the guide via D-Bus, and uses rtmpdump to stream the shows via HTTP.  Rygel then publishes the guide via the UPnP media server protocol and provides MPEG2 versions of the streams if clients need them.

There are still a few rough edges though.  The video from iView comes as 640×480 with a 16:9 aspect ratio so has a 4:3 pixel aspect ratio, but there is nothing in the video file to indicate this (I am not sure if flash video supports this metadata).

Getting Twisted and D-Bus to cooperate

Since I’d decided to use Twisted, I needed to get it to cooperate with the D-Bus bindings for Python.  The first step here was to get both libraries using the same event loop.  This can be achieved by setting Twisted to use the glib2 reactor, and enabling the glib mainloop integration in the D-Bus bindings.

Next was enabling asynchronous D-Bus method implementations.  There is support for this in the D-Bus bindings, but has quite a different (and less convenient) API compared to Twisted.  A small decorator was enough to overcome this impedence:

from functools import wraps

import dbus.service
from twisted.internet import defer

def dbus_deferred_method(*args, **kwargs):
    def decorator(function):
        function = dbus.service.method(*args, **kwargs)(function)
        @wraps(function)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            dbus_callback = kwargs.pop('_dbus_callback')
            dbus_errback = kwargs.pop('_dbus_errback')
            d = defer.maybeDeferred(function, *args, **kwargs)
            d.addCallbacks(
                dbus_callback, lambda failure: dbus_errback(failure.value))
        wrapper._dbus_async_callbacks = ('_dbus_callback', '_dbus_errback')
        return wrapper
    return decorator

This decorator could then be applied to methods in the same way as the @dbus.service.method method, but it would correctly handle the case where the method returns a Deferred. Unfortunately it can’t be used in conjunction with @defer.inlineCallbacks, since the D-Bus bindings don’t handle varargs functions properly. You can of course call another function or method that uses @defer.inlineCallbacks though.

The iView Guide

After coding this, it became pretty obvious why it takes so long to load up the iView flash player: it splits the guide data over almost 300 XML files.  This might make sense if it relied on most of these files remaining unchanged and stored in cache, however it also uses a cache-busting technique when requesting them (adding a random query component to the URL).

Most of these files are series description files (some for finished series with no published programs).  These files contain a title, a short description, the URL for a thumbnail image and the IDs for the programs belonging to the series.  To find out about those programs, you need to load all the channel guide XML files until you find which one contains the program.  Going in the other direction, if you’ve got a program description from the channel guide and want to know about the series it belongs to (e.g. to get the thumbnail), you need to load each series description XML file until you find the one that contains the program.  So there aren’t many opportunities to delay loading of parts of the guide.

The startup time would be a lot easier if this information was collapsed down to a smaller number of larger XML files.

One Comment

  1. Posted 6 July, 2009 at 6:18 pm | Permalink

    Totally agree with you about the XML files. I myself did a similar thing — found out about the whole XML file hierarchy, demixing the RTMP streams, and the glorious 640×480 16:9 aspect ratio.

    Wrote a simple PyGTK app to scrape and parse these (I used BeautifulSoup), but your implementation is way better, so I’d be ashamed to share my code. ;)