Seeking in Transcoded Streams with Rygel

When looking at various UPnP media servers, one of the features I wanted was the ability to play back my music collection through my PlayStation 3.  The complicating factor is that most of my collection is encoded in Vorbis format, which is not yet supported by the PS3 (at this point, it doesn’t seem likely that it ever will).

Both MediaTomb and Rygel could handle this to an extent, transcoding the audio to raw LPCM data to send over the network.  This doesn’t require much CPU power on the server side, and only requires 1.4 Mbit/s of bandwidth, which is manageable on most home networks.  Unfortunately the only playback controls enabled in this mode are play and stop: if you want to pause, fast forward or rewind then you’re out of luck.

Given that Rygel has a fairly simple code base, I thought I’d have a go at fixing this.  The first solution I tried was the one I’ve mentioned a few times before: with uncompressed PCM data file offsets can be easily converted to sample numbers, so if the source format allows time based seeking, we can easily satisfy byte range requests.

I got a basic implementation of this working, but it was a little bit jumpy and not as stable as I’d like.  Before fully debugging it, I started looking at the mysterious DLNA options I’d copied over to get things working.  One of those was the “DLNA operation”, which was set to “range” mode.  Looking at the GUPnP header files, I noticed there was another value named “timeseek”.  When I picked this option, the HTTP requests from the PS3 changed:

GET /... HTTP/1.1
Host: ...
User-Agent: PLAYSTATION 3
Connection: Keep-Alive
Accept-Encoding: identity
TimeSeekRange.dlna.org: npt=0.00-
transferMode.dlna.org: Streaming

The pause, rewind and fast forward controls were now active, although only the pause control actually worked properly. After fast forwarding or rewinding, the PS3 would issue another HTTP request with the TimeSeekRange.dlna.org header specifying the new offset, but the playback position would reset to the start of the track when the operation completed. After a little more experimentation, I found that the playback position didn’t reset if I included TimeSeekRange.dlna.org in the response headers. Of course, I was still sending back the beginning of the track at this point but the PS3 acted as though it was playing from the new point in the song.

It wasn’t much more work to update the GStreamer calls to seek to the requested offset before playback and things worked pretty much as well as for non-transcoded files.  And since this solution didn’t involve byte offsets, it also worked for Rygel’s other transcoders.  It even worked to an extent with video files, but the delay before playback was a bit too high to make it usable — fixing that would probably require caching the GStreamer pipeline between HTTP requests.

Thoughts on DLNA

While it can be fun to reverse engineer things like this, it was a bit annoying to only be able to find out about the feature by reading header files written by people with access to the specification.  I can understand having interoperability and certification requirements to use the DLNA logo, but that does not require that the specifications be private.

As well as keeping the specification private, it feels like some aspects have been intentionally obfuscated, using bit fields represented in both binary and hexadecimal string representations inside the resource’s protocol info.  This might seem reasonable if it was designed for easy parsing, but you need to go through two levels of XML processing (the SOAP envelope and then the DIDL payload) to get to these flags.  Furthermore, the attributes inherited from the UPnP MediaServer specifications are all human readable so it doesn’t seem like an arbitrary choice.

On the bright side, I suppose we’re lucky they didn’t use cryptographic signatures to lock things down like Apple has with some of their protocols and file formats.

5 Comments

  1. Dom
    Posted 24 July, 2009 at 6:13 pm | Permalink

    Hey sounds great. Do you have a branch or an ETA when we might see the fixes in git://git.gnome.org/rygel ? :)

  2. Posted 24 July, 2009 at 7:14 pm | Permalink

    @Dom: should be merged soon (Zeeshan is reviewing/merging it).

  3. Zeeshan Ali
    Posted 24 July, 2009 at 8:18 pm | Permalink

    Already merged!

  4. Posted 28 July, 2009 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

    Did you try the “PS3 media server” – http://ps3mediaserver.blogspot.com/? It’s a java dlna server, but at least in the 1.20betas it’s just so pleasant to use, and even auto-transcodes most formats which the PS3 does not understand.

  5. Posted 4 August, 2009 at 6:43 pm | Permalink

    @maxauthority: I hadn’t seen that package before I started hacking on this feature in Rygel. Given Rygel’s integration with GNOME and FreeDesktop.org technologies, it seems like a better code base to work on.