Posts Tagged ‘conference’

GNOME@FOSDEM 2014 – Stand and Panel

Friday, February 7th, 2014

It is this time of the year again *yay*. The biggest and greatest Free Software conference took place in Brussels, Belgium. It’s good to see all those interested and passionate people care about Free Software. I hope that the (intellectual) gravity of the people gets more people interested and strengthens our communities. In fact, I feel it was one of the better FOSDEMs so far. Maybe even the best. We, GNOME, had a hand full (not kidding) of new members of our communities staffing the booth or just being available. I was very please to see new faces and to identify them as people who were very committed to Free Software and GNOME.

As indicated, we, GNOME, had a booth and a fun time entertaining people stopping by. With the help of many volunteers, we presented our most recent GNOME release, sold some t-shirts, and discussed our future ideas. It’s not necessarily a venue to convince people to use Free Software, or even to use GNOME. But I have the feeling we manage to get both messages across. Bar one case in which an unlucky fellah was angry about everything and especially that this Linux 20 we had installed wouldn’t ship Emacs by default. Other than that we showed people how cool the GNOME Shell extensions are, how to quickly launch applications, or how to access the notification area quickly. Or, yes of course, how to suspend. Or to shutdown…

I also had the pleasure of being interviewed by an Irish dude who produced episodes for Hacker Public Radio. I didn’t know about that but it seems to be a cool project. I don’t know when it will go live or whether it actually has been published already.

We also had panel with the governing bodies of GNOME and KDE. The intention was to debunk some myths and to make the work more visible. I was on the Panel (on behalf of GNOME) with Kat (from GNOME…) and Lydia from KDE. She was joined by Cornelius who serves on the KDE board for more than 9 years. We were lamenting about various aspects of our work such as where does money come from, where does it go to, what are the processes of getting rid of the money. But also why we were doing that, why we think it is important and what achievements we are proud of. Our host, Paul, was a nice and fun guy and did his job very well. I think it was a successful event. It could probably have been better in the sense that we could have focussed more on the audience and making them want to step up and take over responsibilities. But the way it went and the participation of the audience makes me happy nonetheless.

Update: The interviews have been posted: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps.php?id=1452

(Late) report on 30C3

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Oh, I almost missed to report on this year’s CCCongress, 30C3. The thirtieths CCCongress. It has grown considerably over the last few years. We’ve reached over 9000 visitors whereas we had 4000 a couple of years ago. The new venue in Hamburg is amazing. Despite the impressive number of attendees, it didn’t feel crowded at all. So many nice details made the venue just awesome. It really felt like it was *the* place to be. A rather big detail was the installation of a letter shoot. Yes, a real pneumatic postal delivery system. With routing and all. Just amazing.

That’s pretty much all I have to say. It was, of course, nice to meet so many old friends and people. I couldn’t even say hi to all of the ones I wanted to meet. What follows is a bit of a rundown of some of the talks that I’ve actually seen, hoping you can evaluate whether you want to see any of that yourself.

I was a bit late for the conference, probably one of the first talks I’ve seen was DJB on, guess what, crypto. It even has a reference to Poettering (who I was also able to meet :-) )!

Funnily enough, Nate from the EFF mentioned DJB in his talk on disclosure Dos and Donts. He said that it would be smart to think about how much fuzz one wants to make about a vulnerability at hand. Sure enough, the title needs to be catchy enough for people to notice. If you were DJB, then the lecture hall would be filled even if the title was “DJB has something to say”.

Something that stirred up the community was
Assange’s talk. Apparently sabotaged, the Skype connection wasn’t all too good. But it was also not very interesting. The gist: Sysadmin: Go to the three-letter-agencies and carry out document to become the next Snowden. Good advice.

As for carried out documents, Jake Applebaum presented the NSA’s shopping cart which includes all sorts of scary techniques and technologies. If you have only time to watch one video, make it this one. That’s probably even safer than sitting in the audience. Just after he showed the reconnaissance tools for the investigators to combine various data sources, undoubtedly including cell phone location and people around you, he switched on his cell phone so that the audience would have a connection with him. The one who knows he is being spied on. It was a very emotional talk, too.

Another depressing thing was Jöran talking about the missed (digital) opportunities in education. The most noticeable thing he said was that Apple products are consuming devices only. But the reality is that they make it work 93% of the time as opposed to 90%. But that difference makes teachers use it…

More scary, was the presentation on exploration and exploitation SD card controllers. You’re basically screwed. You have close to no idea what it running on the micro controller on your SD card. And on the various other controllers you carry around. They got themselves access to the chip and were able to flash their own firmware. Doesn’t sound all too exciting, but it is an eye opener that your stupid almost invisible SD card can spy on you.

A strange talk was the one on Digital Bank robberies. There are so many weird details they talk about. They claim to have been called for investigation of a malware that found on ATMs in Brazil. The weirdest thing for me was that the physical damage done to the ATMs went unnoticed. The gangsters needed to install a pendrive so they had to break the case. Which apparently isn’t all too secure. And then they had to make the ATM reboot to boot off the pendrive. Without having to press a key. It is unclear to me whether they could leave the pendrive or not. Apparently they could remove it, because if they couldn’t then the malware could have been found much earlier. But given that the ATMs reboot so easily, it would make sense to install the malware on the ATMs hard drive. In that case they could have spotted the malware rather easily. Anyway, the presenting people were not Brazilian. Why would such a sensitive Brazilian investigation be undertaken by foreigners?

Another interesting, although weirdly presented, talk on X Security was given by Ilja van Sprundel. He looked at X code and identified a good number of easily exploitable bugs. No wonder given that the code is 30 years old… He also mentioned libraries on top of X such as GTK+ or Qt and explained how the security story from GNOME was very different from Qt’s. Essentially: The GNOME guys understood security. Qt didn’t.

On the more fun side, the guys from Ztohoven presented their recent work. They are probably best known for their manipulated video which ran during morning TV shows (IIRC).

In their presentation they talked about their performance for which they obtained numbers from parliamentarians and sent them text messages during a session that was aired live. Quite funny, actually. And the technical details are also interesting.

Another artsy piece is “Do You Think That’s Funny?” (program link) in which the speaker describes the troubles their artistic group had to go through during or after their performances. They did things like vote auction (WP), Alanohof, or AnuScan, and their intention is to make surveillance visible and show how it makes activists censor themselves.

MRMCD2013

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

It’s been a while since I attended the mrmcds. In 2011 the event did not take place and I couldn’t make it the year after. Fortunately, 2013 allowed me to participate and I was heavily surprised by the quality of everything. The (newish) location, the people, the provided catering, the atmosphere, …

wlan stats

The event itself is relatively small. I don’t have numbers but I felt like being surrounded by 100 people. Although the stats about connected devices suggests there were at least twice or thrice as many people present.

trolley

The talks were good, a refreshing mix of technical and non-technical content. With an audience generally inclined to discuss things. That allowed for more lively sessions which create new insights, also for the speakers. My favourite was Akiko talking about her job as air traffic controller. I learned a lot about how the aviation industry is organised how various pieces fit together.

fukami doro

Fukami keynoted the conference and tried to make us aware of our ethics. Surveillance was made by hackers, he said. People like you and me. The exercise for the audience was to further think and conclude that if we didn’t help implementing and deploying surveillance infrastructure, it wouldn’t have gotten that bad. While the talk itself wasn’t too bad, I wonder who the target audience was. If it meant to wake up young hackers who have not yet adjusted their moral compass, it was too weak. The talk didn’t really give advice as to how to handle dubious situations. If it was not meant for those hackers, then why talk about it in a very basic way and not ask hard questions? Anyway, I enjoyed seeing the issue of people’s responsibility coming up and creating a discussion among the hackers.

Enjoy Cock

Mine and Stef’s talk went well, although it was the in the very last slot of the conference. After two long party nights. I barely made it to the talk myself :D We presented new ideas to guide the user when it comes to security critical questions. If you have been to GUADEC, then you haven’t missed much. The talk got a slight new angle though. In case you are interested in the slides, you can find them here.

clocks

The design of the conference was very impressive. The theme was aviation and not only did we have an impressive talk monitor as seen above, we also had trolleys with drinks and food as well as the time for various interesting locations. We also received amazing gadgets like the laser engraved belt made from the typical air plane seatbelt.

As always, parties were had with own DJs, light show, beer straight from the tap, cool people and music. To summarize: I’m glad to have visited a very enjoyable event. It’s a pleasure to be around all those smart hackers and to have inspiring discussions. I’m looking forward to next year.

erklaerbaer

OWASP AppSec Research EU 2013 – Hamburg

Friday, August 30th, 2013

I was lucky to be able to attend OWASP’s AppSec EU Research conference in Hamburg, Germany. I’ve been to the one in Dublin and looked forward to the German edition. With 400+ attendees I thought that the conference was surprisingly well attended. And rightfully so. The people organising it were doing a fantastic job. Everything seemed to work smoothly and although I volunteered I was able to see a good bunch of talks.

The program looked promising and most of it was quite good. I was told that there will be recordings soon which is also quite remarkable. The video team definitely deserves a round of applause. So does the venue. We were locked up in the upper most floor of the Emporio, which allowed for awesome views over Hamburg. Although I’ve lived in that beautiful city for so long, I didn’t realise one could actually get such a nice view from a conference room. Sometimes it was hard to not get distracted by the views during the talks…

The first talk I attended was given by Paul Stone and he showed us how he reads your browsing history and pixels. This is amazing work. He examplified the significance of these attacks by showing how to obtain the Google+ profile information. His trick was to apply some obscure SVG filters to HTML elements. Based on the amount of time it took to do so, he could deduce whether the pixel was black or white. He leveraged that possibility to read source code by analysing properties of the fonts used and what key pixels exist to tell which character was rendered. So amazing. If you have time to only watch one talk, it should be this one.

The next talk on Burp was given by Nicolas Gregoire. I was not so impressed, because it was mainly a tutorial as to where to click to make it do $things. But I was told by people actually using burp that it was insightful and interesting.

Taras Ivashchenko from Yandex was talking about Content Security Policy (CSP). I was surprised to learn that Yandex have their own browser. And that their bigger service is mail. I thought it was search. The title of the talk promised an answer to the question whether the CSP was actually useful. He didn’t deliver though. But it gave an insight to how a big company with a well used web site deploys CSP. Unfortunately, he couldn’t tell how much effort it actually was and whether it was actually an economical decision.

He reminded us that the CSP was a second line of defense. It’s not a solution to broken code which does not escape properly. It’s merely a parachute to land safely in case you screwed up. I found it interesting that he mentioned ten contexts that one would potentially need to escape for. My conclusion is that JavaScript is probably the worst language to use on the Web as it offers only two escaping functions. And not even for the most important contexts like plain HTML. I’m curious to learn about all ten contexts. Another interesting idea he presented was that CSP may allow inline scripts if they are “signed”. The “signature” was a random string that is shipped with a header and the script element on the page must carry a “nonce” attribute with that random number.

Matryoshka was the theme of Eduardo Vela’s talk. The Google guy showed various hacks, one of them was “wrapping overflow leaks on frames (wolf)”. It was possible to get an idea of the word rendered on a page with mocking around with the page’s width and height. With the information about the dimension you could detect when a scrollbar was placed and hence can find out how wide the wrapped word was. He claimed that especially new performance APIs were going to create a whole lot of privacy related issues. Another problem was the lack of a JSON format validator, he said. Several problems such as deep array parsing would currently exist. If you serialise a big enough array, you could get into trouble, he said.

A great show was delivered by Mario Heiderich talking about the The innerHTML Apocalypse. He compared the three currently distinguished types of Cross-Site scripting (XSS), namely reflected, stored, and DOM-based XSS, with the three horsemen. The fourth horseman, he said, were “mXSS”, mutation-based XSS. Essentially it is circumventing HTML filter libraries by using mutations done by the web browser.

The problem, inappropriately shortened, was that people use “document.write” to inject elements into the DOM instead of using proper DOM APIs. But that is, he claimed, due to convenience. A call to “document.innerHTML” was so much easier than calling out to “createElement”, “addChild”, etc. And it is true. Too bad that, as we’ve learned earlier, using JavaScript is totally inappropriate to write web applications as it cannot even escape for the HTML context. Anyway, the browser is quite relaxed and accepts slightly malformed HTML. It will even do optimisations or transformations for you. Internet Explorer, for example, will happily drop quotes around arguments to HTML tags for you.

To make the long story short: CSS escapes are badly handled in many of the existing escaping libraries. So you could break out of the element’s contexts by cleverly using some CSS escape sequences. Also, SVG should be avoided at all costs. It’s a can of worms, he said. You could do so many evil things within SVG, like executing JavaScript, loading remote resources or accessing attributes.

OWASP AppSec Reseaerch EU 2013 was good fun. The location was absolutely fantastic. Probably the most noble venue I was at to have a conference. The organisation looked flawless and everything seemed to work out smoothly. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to meet great people. I hope to be able to do so for the next conference.

GUADEC 2013 in Brno

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

I also attended this year’s GUADEC and it was quite good. Especially because the weather was so nice. It was so burning hot that I sometimes wished it wasn’t; especially in the night… My room in the Taufer dormitories, whose service was basic at best, was heating up so heavily over the day that it took until 4 in the morning to be cool enough to be able to sleep. When opening the cold (!) water tap, the water was as warm as a mildly hot shower… But well, GUADEC is not about sleeping anyway, right? ;-)

I was kept busy with various meeting before, while and after the conference and I piled up work lasting for a few months, I guess…

The conference itself was nicely organised. The bar was set quite high last year, so I didn’t expect this year’s team to match the overall quality. And they didn’t, but they were close. The staff was helpful and professional. Issues were dealt with promptly and quite well. I hope, again, that the knowledge gained can be transferred to future GUADEC organisers.

As for the talks, I couldn’t follow many of them. The ones I have seen were mostly great. We had (too?) many keynotes which were generally interesting. Too bad the crowd didn’t notice it was trolled by Ethan Lee. He is a game developer who ported games to Linux. The message was poor and I doubt we, GNOME, profited from this keynote. The next keynote was given by the CEO of Endless Mobile, a company which tries to leverage the potential of the “middle of the pyramid” to get the next billion users and “get 50% of the market share”. The idea is to bring a cheap enough, but also elegant enough device to the people who can afford a 40 inch TV (via loans) but not a PC. As they want to sell ARM devices, he asked us to make GNOME run better on ARM chips. Cathy Malmrose, CEO of computer manufacturing company zareason, was keynoting the last day. The company puts only GNU/Linux systems on their machines before shipping them to customers. The computers they sell range from desktops over laptops to tablets. She told us that we were quite well positioned, because GNOME was so easily usable by people who don’t have much or any experience with computers. That was very refreshing and I am happy that she told us that we were doing very well. She was opening a perspective many of us probably didn’t think about before. She was really enthusiastic about Free Software and my feeling was that she cared more about the Freedoms than many of the participants.

Other talks by members of the GNOME community were lively and one the most enjoying talks was given by the sysadmin team. It was nice to be able to applaud for them in person, because they are doing such a great job.

There were Twitter walls (hehe) in every room (supposedly made with QML) and I found it to be mainly distracting while at the same time not very informative. The news running over it were mostly not worth the electricity they consumed.

Anyway, thanks to the local team and all the sponsors for making such a great event happen! If you have anything to say, leave your feedback on the wiki.

Sponsored by GNOME!

GNOME.Asia Summit 2013

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

This year’s GNOME.Asia Summit took place in Seoul, Korea. It’s my second GNOME.Asia Summit after the previous one in Hongkong and it’s again amazing to see how nice the local team put everything together.

SAM_1416

Initially I thought I’ll go to Seoul straight from LinuxTag which would have been quite stressful. Unfortunately, LinuxTag didn’t happen for GNOME :-\ We lacked people to run the booth and it’s insane to try to run the booth with only two or three people over four days. So I went more or less straight to Seoul. Via CDG. So far I didn’t like that airport because it is huge and transfers between terminals are very slow and the terminals themselves rather poor in terms of infrastructure (power, seats, WiFi, shops). But terminal 2E was surprisingly nice. It’s got designeresque chairs to sit in, lots of power sockets, free WiFi, some shops, water fountains, and it’s generally airy. So thumbs up for that.

SAM_1418

As for Seoul, things went surprisingly well. While i did organise this GNOME.Asia Summit to some extent I didn’t expect things to work out that nicely. The local team, which was pretty much unknown to me, was surprisingly big and they found a good venue and good sponsors.

GNOME Asia Summit

Lemote gave us a few laptops to give away *yay*. A raffle was organized and the best speaker got the biggest machine. I didn’t win in the raffle, but I got a machine as the best speaker. It’s a Lemote Loongson. I don’t know yet whether it is what I need. I have a very underspecced Lenovo ideapad which barely runs GNOME. Running anything that requires memory is really dreadful. Yes Firefox, looking at you. And some things like Gajim, an XMPP client, don’t even work because the machine starts to swap so heavily that every TCP connection times out. Again and again. I have to explore whether the Lemote laptop performs any better. It’s MIPS after all. And according to Wikipedia the CPU alone draws 15W.

SAM_1452

Anyway, the conference itself was good and I felt that it was bringing together people nicely. I hope that it relevant Korean businesses are happy, too. We will have to see though whether any measurable output has been generated.

The reactions to my talk about GNOME 3.8 were, as already mentioned, positive. To my surprise I have to say. I was still a bit tired and jetlagged, but from talking to people afterwards I know that I inspired some folks to take a closer look at GNOME. You can find my slides here.

CAM00344

I found a surprising large number of other talks interesting, too. Unfortunately, the aforementioned laptop died while taking notes so I can’t provided a nice summary. The most interesting thing I found was a talk about seafile. A Dropbox-like tool which sounds really good. But to be ready they have to fix some design problems like depending on a local webserver or not using established authentication and encryption protocols (think SSH).

SAM_5438

I’m happy for the GNOME.Asia. May it prosper in the future. I hope we can gain some more sponsors for future editions of the event and also for GNOME. As other people already stated: I’d like to thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my attendance at the conference. I’d also like to thank the conference sponsors for their support, including NIPA, Lemote, LG, Google, Linux Pilot, ONOFFMIX and Bloter.net.

Sponsored by GNOME!

20th DFN CERT Workshop

Monday, March 25th, 2013

I was fortunate enough to be able to attend this year’s DFN Workshop which happened to be an anniversary as the event turned 20. Needless to say that I didn’t make all 20 ;-) Well, I did a few anyway.

The keynote was surprisingly political. Marcus J. Ranum (Tenable Network Security) talked about Cyberwar – A Matter of Logistics and Privilege and made witty and thoughtful points. So he asked questions such as whether Stuxnet was an act of terrorism and whether its victims could sue the US to get their damages reimbursed. Highly interesting subject, highly interesting speaker.

Jan Ole Malchow presented “distPaste”, a HTML 5 based webapp that uses all the browsers to store data. So a distributed storage. Might be related to the fun project FillDisk.com.

Jens Liebchen from the awesome Redteam Pentesting did again a nice presentation this year. They got a new “Multi Function Printer” like a Canon C5051i (so a huge thing…) and had certain requirements regarding its security. He presented a threat model and shared some insights he gained while dealing with the vendor, and, more importantly, after having analysed the machine himself. It turns out that the device has a regular hard drive and runs some flavour of Linux with a big BLOB for their services. However, data was found to be spread over the partitions even though they bought a licence for “secure deletion” of data. They, rightfully, did not expect to find traces of their print or scan jobs. He mentioned that the security properties of such devices were not assessed yet. So there are loads of toys to play with.

Also funny was the work of Benjamin Kahler and Steffen Wendzel who did “Wardriving against building automation“. Basically, the question was how easy it is to break into a network and remote control the building, i.e. open doors and windows. Turns out, there are standard products which are not well secured and the deployment is usually not done properly either, so that network boundaries either don’t exist or can be passed easily.

The security of Android-App’s SSL/TLS usage was presented by Matthew Smith. They examined many many “Apps”, decompiled them and statically analysed how well they handle various conditions when building up a TLS connection. Apparently, many programs just do not care about the security properties of their TLS connection so that they just disable the verification of the certificate chain. The model is said to be too complex and too burdensome to set up during development. They also recommended to introduce a new privilege, namely sending data unencryptely. So that a user could select that an application must not transfer data as plain text.

Besides listening to the talks and chatting to people, I tried to get on the wireless in the hotel. Turns out, they interfere with your traffic, i.e. they block everything and redirect your web traffic to present you a landing page from which you are supposed to log in to the gratis wireless. The credentials to be entered were the room number and the last name of a guest of that room. Well, given the speakers and attendees list (or some knowledge of popular names in the region) it seems easy enough to just poke some data in and hope for the best. Or, instead of doing that manually, have a program doing that for you. Voila, je vous presente “petitelysee”. A simple Python script to try to log in to a landing page. As I’ve said, it’s the result of three hours or so work. So it’s not very nicely done and I obviously didn’t try it out. It has just been coded in a way that I *think* might work.

GNOME @ FOSDEM 2013

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Phew, I’m excited about FOSDEM and also exhausted. We had a nice GNOME presence with a lovely booth, many helpers and nice shirts. Thanks to everyone involved who made it such a success.

Our current T-shirt was designed last minute by Andreas, printed last second by an awesome printing shop, and I like it very much. Especially the girly shirts have a nice colour. The shirt accompanies our current Friends of GNOME campaign about Privacy and Security.

In case you haven’t heard: GNOME is raising money to make GNOME more privacy aware, i.e. to allow to you to use your computer anonymously or leave as few traces behind as possible. Also security is a vital part, so maybe the money will be spent on enabling the chat to transfer files encryptedly or better OpenPGP integration into GNOME. If you want to support these goals, consider becoming a Friend of GNOME. Also, if you only want one of those shirts, become a Friend of GNOME, because at a certain level, you will be eligible to get hold of one of those t-shirts :-)

Unfortunately, our donation process depends heavily on Paypal and is quite US centric. That’s not very nice, the majority of donations does not come from the US. In fact, many donations come from Europe.

Anyway, I couldn’t attend a single talk at FOSDEM, because I was so busy with the booth and with maintaining relationships with friends from other Free Software projects, i.e. OpenSuSE. They had, again, a very nice presence and “The Old Toad”, a nice German beer, which is really needed since the Belgian beer is barely drinkable ;-)

As for the GNOME night out, the GNOME Beer Event, it was seriously crowded. While we occupied the upper floor of a bar the last year, we had two floors this year. We did advertise it. Well enough it seems. We went through the building we had our booth in and taped loads of paper onto the walls and pillars. Not only beer event ads but also posters about GNOME Outreach program for Women or the fact that we had T-Shirts on sale.

Our stand was probably the second most beautiful after the OpenSuSE one. Our T-Shirts were aligned up nicely and we sold quite a few of them. Preliminary statistics suggest that we managed to convince people to buy something between 100 and 150 t-shirts. Next time we better try to provide more girly shirts in larger sizes as they ran out quickly. The KDE folks did have many girly shirts but overall their booth didn’t seem to be as well run as the other years.

While the booth generally went well, our interaction story with the people isn’t great. So far, we have a demo machine in the middle of the table which makes it really hard to do stuff together or to show off things, because you can’t really look at what the person is doing neither can you easily show stuff. So maybe putting the machine on either edge of the table would help.

I’m looking very forward to next year’s FOSDEM, hoping that we will have, again, a great set of people willing to spend their time standing there for GNOME.

Talks at FOSS.in 2012

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Let me recap the talks held at FOSS.in a bit. It’s a bit late, I’m sorry for that, but the festive season was a bit demanding, timewise.

FOSS.IN

The conference started off smoothly with a nice Indian breakfast, coffee and good chats. The introductory talk by Atul went well and by far not as long as we expected it to be. Atul was obviously not as energetic as he used to be. I think he grew old and does visibly suffer from his illness. So a big round of applause and a bigger bucket of respect for pulling this event off nonetheless.

The first talk of the day was given by Gopal and he talked about “Big Data”. He started off with a definition and by claiming that what is considered to be big data now, is likely not to be considered big data in the future. We should think about 1GB RAM now in our laptops. Everybody ran 1GB or more in their laptops. But 10 years ago that would not have been the case. The only concept, he said, that survived was “Divide and Conquer”. That is to break up a problem into smaller sub problems which then can be run on many processing units in parallel. Hence distributed data and distributed processing was very important.

The prime example of big data was to calculate the count of unique items in a large set, i.e. compare the vocabulary of two books. You split up the books into words to find the single words and then count every one of them to find out how often it was present. You could also preprocess the words with a “stemming filter” to get rid of forms and flexions. If your data was big enough, “sort | uniq” wouldn’t do it, because “sort” would use up all your memory. To do it successfully anyway, you can split your data up, do the sorting and then merge the sort result. He was then explaining how to split up various operations and merge them together. Basically, it was important to split and merge every operation possible to scale well. And that was exactly what “Hadoop” does. In fact, it’s got several components that facilitate dealing with all that: “splitter”, “mapper”, “combiner”, “partitioner” , “shuffle fetch” and a “reducer”. However, getting data into Hadoop, was painful, he said.

Lydia from KDE talked about “Wikidata – The foundation to build your apps on“. She introduced her talk with a problem: “Which drugs are approved for pregnancy in the US?”. She said, that the Wikipedia couldn’t really answer this question easily, because maintaining such a list would be manual labour which is not really fascinating. One would have to walk through every article about a drug and try to find the information whether it was approved or not and then condense it to a list. She was aiming at, I guess, Wikipedia not really storing sematic data.

Wikidata wants to be similar to Wikimedia Commons, but for data of the world’s knowledge. It seems to that missing semantic storage which is also able to store information about the sources of the information that confirm correctness. Something like the GDP of a country or length of a river would be prime examples of use cases for Wikidata. Eventually this will increase the number of editors because the level to contribute will be lowered significantly. Also every Wikipedia language can profit immediately because it can be easily hooked up.

I just had a quick peek at Drepper’s workshop on C++11, because it was very packed. Surprisingly many people wanted to listen to what he had to say about the new C++. Since I was not really present I can’t really provide details on the contents.

Lenny talked about politics in Free Software projects. As the title was “Pushing Big Changes“, the talk revolved around issues around acquiring and convincing people to share your vision and have your project accepted by the general public. He claimed that the Internet is full of haters and that one needed a thick skin to survive the flames on the Internet. Very thick in fact.

An interesting point he made was, that connections matter. Like personal relationships with relevant people and being able to influence them. And he didn’t like it. That, and the talk in general, was interesting, because I haven’t really heard anyone talking about that so openly. Usually, everybody praises Free Software communities as being very open, egalitarian and what not. But not only rumour has it, that this is rarely the case. Anyway, The bigger part of the talk was quite systemd centric though and I don’t think it’s applicable to many other projects.

A somewhat unusual talk was given by Ben & Daniel, talking about how to really use Puppet. They do it at Mozilla at a very large scale and wanted to share some wisdom they gained.

They had a few points to make. Firstly: Do not store business data (as opposed to business logic) in Puppet modules. Secondly: Put data in “PuppetDB” or use “Hiera”. Thirdly: Reuse modules from either the “PuppetForge” or Github. About writing your own modules, they recommended to write generic enough code with parametrised classes to support many more configurations. Also, they want you to stick to the syntax style guide.

Sebastian from the KDE fame talked about KDE Plasma and how to make us succeed on mobile targets such as mobile phones or tablets. Me, not knowing “Plasma” at all, was interested to learn that Plasma was “a technology that makes it easy to build modern user interfaces”. He briefly mentioned some challenges such as running on multiple devices with or without touchscreens. He imagines the operating system to be provided by Mer and then run Plasma on top. He said that there was a range of devices that were supported at the moment. The developer story was also quite good with “Plasma Quick” and the Mer SDK.

He tried to have devices manufactured by Chinese companies and told some stories about the problems involved. One of them being that “Freedom” (probably as in Software Freedom) was not in their vocabulary. So getting free drivers was a difficult, if not impossible, task. Another issue was the size of orders, so you can’t demand anything with a order of a size of 10000 units, he said. But they seem to be able to pull it off anyway! I’m very eager to see their devices.

The last talk, which was the day’s keynote, went quite well and basically brought art and code together. He introduced us to Processing, some interesting programming IDE to produce mainly visual arts. He praised how Free Software (although he referred to it as Open Source) made everybody more creative and how the availability of art transformed the art landscape. It was interesting to see how he used computers to express his creativity and unfortunately, his time was up quite quickly.

Drepper, giving quite a few talks, also gave a talk about parallel programming. The genesis of problem was the introduction of multiple processors into a machine. It got worse when threads were introduced where they share the address space. It allowed for easy data sharing between threads but also made corrupting other threads very very easy. Also in subtle ways that you would not anticipate like that all threads share one working directory and if one thread changed it, it would be changed for all the threads of the process. Interestingly, he said that threads are not something that the end user shall use, but rather a tool for the system to exploit parallelism. The system shall provide better means for the user to use parallelism.

He praised Haskell for providing very good means for using threads. It is absolutely side effect free and even stateful stuff is modelled side effect free. So he claimed that it is a good research tool, but that it is not as efficient as C or C++. He also praised Futures (with OpenMP) where the user doesn’t have to care about the details about the whole threading but leave it up to the system. You only specify what can run in parallel and the system does it for you. Finally, he introduced into C++11 features that help using parallelism. There are various constructs in the language that make it easy to use futures, including anonymous functions and modelling thread dependencies. I didn’t like them all too much, but I think it’s cool that the language allows you to use these features.

There was another talk from Mozilla’s IT given by Shyam and he talked about DNSSec. He started with a nice introduction to DNSSec. It was a bit too much, I feel, but it’s a quite complicated topic so I appreciate all the efforts he made. The main point that I took away was to not push the DS too soon, because if you don’t have signed zones yet, resolvers don’t trust your answers and your domain is offline.

Olivier talked about GStreamer 1.0. He introduced into the GStreamer technology by telling that its concept is around elements, which are put in bins and that elements have source and sink pads that you connect. New challenges were DSPs, different processing units like GPUs. The new 1.0 included various new features better locking support that makes it easier for languages like Python or better memory management with GstBufferPool.

I couldn’t really follow the rest of the talks as I was giving one myself and was busy talking to people afterwards. It’s really amazing how interested people are and to see the angle they ask questions from.

2.9-C/3 – N.O-T/MY(D/E.PA/R.T-ME-N/T.

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

Just a quick note: 29C3 rocked. Awesome location, awesome people, awesome talks. Very nice indeed.

Very brief thumbs up: Videos were available almost right after the talks. In a stunning quality. Also live streams. How many conferences do you know that do that?

Also, I consider this to be particularly interesting.

Sorry to all those I couldn’t talk to long enough or at all. Hope to see you again next year!