Posts Tagged ‘maemo’

Pwnitter

Saturday, September 10th, 2011

Uh, I totally forgot to blog about a funny thing that happened almost a year ago which I just mentioned slightly *blush*. So you probably know this Internet thing and if you’re one of the chosen and carefully gifted ones, you confused it with the Web. And if you’re very special you do this Twitter thing and expose yourself and your communications pattern to some dodgy American company. By now, all of the following stuff isn’t of much interest anymore, so you might as well quit reading.

It all happenend while being at FOSS.in. There was a contest run by Nokia which asked us to write some cool application for the N900. So I did. I packaged loads of programs and libraries to be able to put the wireless card into monitor mode. Then I wiretapped (haha) the wireless and sniffed for Twitter traffic. Once there was a Twitter session going on, I sniffed the necessary authentication information was extracted and a message was posted on the poor user’s behalf. I coined that Pwnitter, because it would pwn you via Twitter.

That said, we had great fun at FOSS.in, where nearly everybodies Twitter sessions got hijacked ;-) Eventually, people stopped using plain HTTP and moved to end to end encrypted sessions via TLS.

Anyway, my program didn’t win anything because as it turned out, Nokia wanted to promote QML and hence we were supposed to write something that makes use of that. My program barely has a UI… It is made up of one giant button…

Despite not getting lucky with Nokia, the community apparently received the thing very well.

So there is an obvious big elephant standing in the room asking why would you want to “hack” Twitter. I’d say it’s rather easy to answer. The main point being that you should use end to end encryption when doing communication. And the punchline comes now: Don’t use a service that doesn’t offer you that by default. Technically, it wouldn’t be much of a problem to give you an encrypted link to send your messages. However, companies tend to be cheap and let you suffer with a plain text connection which can be easily tapped or worse: manipulated. Think about it. If the company is too frugal to protect your communication from pimpled 13yr olds with a wifi card, why would you want to use their services?

By now Twitter (actually since March 2011, making it more than 6 month ago AFAIK) have SSL enabled by default as far as I can tell. So let’s not slash Twitter for not offering an encrypted link for more than 5 years (since they were founded back in 2006). But there are loads of other services that suffer from the very same basic problem. Including Facebook. And it would be easy to adapt the existing solution stuff like Facebook, flickr, whatnot.

A noteable exception is Google though. As far as I can see, they offer encryption by default except for the search. If there is an unencrypted link, I invite you to grab the sources of Pwnitter and build your hack.

If you do so, let me give you an advise as I was going nuts over a weird problem with my Pwnitter application for Maemo. It’s written in Python and when building the package with setuptools the hashbang would automatically be changed to “#!/scratchbox/tools/bin/python“, instead of, say, “/usr/bin/python“.

I tried tons of things for many hours until I realised, that scratchbox redirects some binary paths.

However, that did not help me to fix the issue. As it turned out, my problem was that I didn’t depend on a python-runtime during build time. Hence the build server picked scratchbox’s python which was located in /scratchbox/bin.

MeeGo Conference 2010 in Dublin

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

The MeeGo Conference 2010 took place from 2010-11-15 until 2010-11-17 and it was quite good. I think I haven’t seen so much money being put into a conference so far. That’s not to be read as a complaint though ;-)

The conference provided loads of things, i.e. lunch, which was apparently sponsored by Novell. It was very good: Yummie lamb stew, cooked salmon and veg was served to be finished with loads of ice cream and coffee. Very delicious. Breakfast was provided by Codethink as far as I can tell. The first reception in the evening was held by Collabora and drinks and food were provided. That was, again, very well and a perfect opportunity to meet and chat with people. In fact, I’ve met a lot old folks that II haven’t seen for at least half a year. But with the KDE folks entering the scene I’ve also met a few new interesting people.

The venue itself is very interesting and they definitely know how to accommodate conference attendees. It’s a stadium and very spacious. There were an awful lot of stadium people taking care of us. The rooms were well equipped although I was badly missing power supply.

The second evening was spent in the Guinness Warehouse, an interesting museum which tells you how the Guinness is made. They also have a bar upstairs and food, drinks and music was provided. I guess the Guinness couldn’t have been better :-)

Third evening was spent in the Stadium itself to watch Ireland playing Norway. Football that is. There was a reception with drinks and food downstairs in the Presidents Suite. They even handed out own scarfs which read “MeeGo Conference”. That was quite decadent. Anyway, I’ve only seen the first half because I was at the bar for the second half, enjoying Guinness and Gin Tonic ;-)

Having sorted out the amnesties (more described here), let’s have a look at the talks that were given. I actually attended a few, although I loved to have visited more.

Enterprise Desktop – Yan Li talked about his work on making MeeGo enterprise ready, meaning to have support for VPNs, Exchange Mail, large LDAP address books, etc… His motivation is to bring MeeGo to his company, Intel. It’s not quite there yet, but apparently there is an Enterprise MeeGo which has a lot of fixes already which were pushed upstream but are not packaged in MeeGo yet. His strategy to bring the devices to the people was to not try to replace the people’s old devices but rather give them an additional device to play with. Interesting approach and I’d actually like to see the results in a year or so.

Compliance – There is a draft specification but the final one will be ready soon. If you want to be compliant, you have to ensure that you are using MeeGo API (Qt, OpenGL ES, …) only. That will make it compatible for the whole minor version series. There will also be profiles (think: Handset, Netbook) which well define additional APIs or available screen estate. In return, you are allowed to use the MeeGo name and the logo. Your man asked the audience to try the compliance tools and give feedback and to review the handset profile draft.

Security – There will be a MSSF, a Mobile Simplified Security Framework in MeeGo 1.2. It’s a MAC system which is supposed to be in mainline. So yes, it is yet another security framework in Linux and I didn’t really understand, why it’s necessary. There’ll be a “Trusted Execution Environment’ (TrEE) as well. That will mean that the device has to have a TPM with a hardwired key that you can’t see nor exchange. I don’t necessarily like TPMs. Besides all that, “Simplified Mandatory Access Control” (SMACK) will be used. It is supposedly like SELinux, but doesn’t suck as much. Everything (processes, network packets, files, I guess other IPC, …) will get labels and policies will be simple. Something like “Application 1 has a red label and only if you have a red label, too, you can talk to Appilcation 1″. We’ll see how that’ll work. On top of all that, an Integrety Protection “IMA” system will be used to load and execute signed binaries only.

Given all that, I don’t like the development in this direction. It clearly is not about the security of the person owning the device in question but about protecting the content mafia. It’s a clear step into the direction of Digital Restriction Management (DRM) under the label of protection the users data. And I’m saying that they are trying to hide it, but they are not calling it by its right name either.

A great surprise was to see Intel and Nokia handing out Lenovo Ideapads to everybody. We were asked to put MeeGo on the machine, effectively removing the Windows installation. Three years ago, when I got my x61s, it was a piece of cake to return your Windows license. By now, things might have changed. We’ll see. I’ll scratch the license sticker off the Laptop and write a letter to Lenovo and see what happens. Smth like this (copied from here):

Lenovo Deutschland GmbH
Gropiusplatz 10
70563 Stuttgart

Rückgabe einer Windows-Lizenz

Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,

hiermit gebe ich die gemeinsam mit einem Lenovo-Notebook erworbene Windows-Lizenz gemäß des End User License Agreement (EULA) von Microsoft Windows zurück.

Das EULA von Windows gewährt mir das Recht, beim Hersteller des Produkts, mit dem ich die Lizenz erworben habe, den Preis für die Windows-Lizenz zurückerstattet zu bekommen, falls die mitgelieferte Windows-Lizenz beim Start nicht aktiviert und registriert wurde und das EULA nicht akzeptiert worden ist. Ich habe der EULA nicht zugestimmt, da sie zahlreiche für mich inakzeptable Punkte enthält, beispielsweise:

- Die Aktivierung der Software sendet Hardware-Informationen an Microsoft (Punkt 2 des EULA).
- „Internetbasierte Dienste“ wie das „Windows-Updatefeature“ können von Microsoft jederzeit gesperrt werden (Punkt 7 des EULA). Dadurch existiert de facto kein Recht auf Security-Updates.

Ich entschied mich stattdessen für das Konkurrenz-Produkt Ubuntu, da dieses eine bessere Qualität aufweist und ein verbraucherfreundlicheres EULA hat.

Sie haben anderen Lenovo-Kunden in der Vergangenheit die Rückgabe der Windows-Lizenz verweigert mit der Verweis, dass es sich bei dem mit dem Gerät erworbenen Windows-Betriebssystem um einen “integrativen Bestandteil” des Produkts handle und man die Windows-Lizenz nur mit dem gesamten Produkt zurückgeben kann.

Diese Auffassung ist aus den folgenden Gründen nicht zutreffend:
- Windows-Lizenzen werden auch einzeln verkauft, eine Bindung von Software an ein bestimmtes Hardware-Gerät (OEM-Vertrag) ist nach deutschem Recht nicht zulässig. [1]
- Das betreffende Notebook lässt sich auch mit anderen, einzeln erhältlichen Betriebssystemen (u.a. Ubuntu) produktiv betreiben. Insbesondere Ihre Produkte laufen mit Ubuntu (mit sehr wenigen Ausnahmen) ganz hervorragend.
- Jedoch lässt sich das vorliegende Notebook nicht ohne Windows-Lizenz oder ganz ohne Betriebssystem erwerben.

Mir sind desweiteren mehrere Fälle bekannt, in denen Sie erfolgreich mit dem von mir verwendeten Formular Windows-Lizenzen zurückerstattet haben.

Ich bitte Sie deshalb, mir die Kosten für die Windows-Lizenz zurückzuerstatten und die erworbene Windows-Lizenz einzeln zurückzunehmen.

Hilfsweise teilen sie mir mit, wie ich das Geraet als ganzes zurureck geben kann.

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

[1] Vgl. dazu das Urteil des BGH I ZR 244/97 vom 6. Juli 2000
(http://tiny.cc/IZR24497 sowie http://www.jurpc.de/rechtspr/20000220.htm).

The performance of MeeGo on that device is actually extremely bad. WiFi is probably the only thing that works out of the box. The touchpad can’t click, the screen doesn’t rotate, the buttons on the screen don’t do anything, locking the screen doesn’t work either, there is no on-screen keyboard, multi touch doesn’t work with the screen, accelerometer doesn’t work. It’s almost embarrassing. But Chromium kinda works. Of course, it can’t actually do all the fancy gmail stuff like phone or video calls. The window management is a bit weird. If you open a browser it’ll get maximised and you’ll get a title bar for the window. And you can drag the title bar to unmaximise the window. But if you then open a new browser window, it’ll be opened on a new “zone”. Hence, it’s quite pointless to have a movable browser window with a title bar. In fact, you can put multiple (arbitrary) windows in zone if you manually drag and drop them from the “zones” tab which is accessible via a quake style top panel. If you put multiple windows into one zone, the window manager doesn’t tile the windows. By the way: If you’re using the touchscreen only, you can’t easily open this top panel bar, because you can’t easily reach the *very* top of the screen. I hope that many people will have a look at these issues now and eventually fix them. Anyway, thanks Intel and Nokia :-)

The beauty of a free (Maemo) handset

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

During GUADEC, I of course wanted to use my N900. But since the PR1.2 update, the Jabber client wouldn’t connect to the server anymore, because OpenSSL doesn’t honor imported CAs. So the only option to make it connect is to ignore SSL errors. But as I’m naturally paranoid, I didn’t dare to connect… It’s a nerdy conference with a lot of hackers after all.

Fortunately, I had all those nice Collaborans next to me and I could ask loads of (stupid?) questions. Turns out, that the Jabber client (telepathy-gabble) on the N900 is a bit old and uses loudmouth and not wocky.

So I brought my SDK back to life (jeez, it’s very inconvenient to do stuff with that scratchbox setup :-( ) and I was surprised that apt-get source libloudmouth1-0 was sufficient to get the code. And apt-get build-dep libloudmouth1-0 && dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot built the package. Almost easy (I had to fix loads of dependency issue but it then worked out).

As neither I nor the Collaborans knew how to integrate with the Certificate Manager, I just wanted to make OpenSSL aware of the root CA which I intended to drop somewhere in ~/.certs or so.

After a couple of busy conference days I found out that code which implements the desired functionality already exists but was commented out. So I adapted that and now loudmouth imports certificates from /home/user/.config/telepathy/trusted-cas.pem or /home/user/.config/telepathy/certs /home/user/.maemosec-certs/ssl-ca before it connects. The former is just a file with all root CAs being PEM encoded. The latter is a directory where you have to put PEM or DER encoded certs into and then run c_rehash . in it the certificate manager puts the certificates in after you’ve imported it. Because just loading any .pem or .der file would have been to easy to work with. It was hard for me to understand OpenSSL’s API. This article helped me a bit though, so you might find it useful, too.

So if you want your jabber client on the N900 to connect to a SSL/TLS secured server that uses a root CA that is not in the built in certificate store, grab the .deb here. You can, of course, get the source as well.

Turns out, that there is a workaround mentioned in bug 9355 hence you might consider it to be easier to modify system files yourself instead of letting the package manager do it.

Bottom line being that it’s wonderful to be allowed to study the code. It’s wonderful to be allowed fix stuff. And it’s wonderful to be allowed to redistribute the software. Even with my own modifications. And that it will be that way for the lifetime of that piece of software. I do love Free Software.

Got a N900 *yay*

Friday, August 20th, 2010

A while back, during FOSS.in, I participated at a Maemo “hacking” contents. The goal was to produce something valuable for Maemo and get a N900 in return. I basically ported Gajim to the N900 and, drumroll, I won! *yay*

Unfortunately, it took them a while to ship that thing so that I received it half a year later or so. But then it was amazingly fast. I received a parcel from Helsinki (2031km far away) which was sent 20hrs earlier. The parcel thus was traveling at ~100km/h. Great service, DHL! Thanks a million Nokia, Thanks Maemo Bangalore!

I really like the N900 because it’s a Linux based device. Well, there is Android, right? But Nokia actually does send it’s patches upstream and they invite you to get root on the device you own. Plus everything is pretty much standard. There is D-Bus, there GTK+, there is Python, there is Linux, … Hence, building and running stuff is pretty easy. I am looking forward to run my DNS Tunnel and DOOM and play around with the USB.

I am now busy playing with my new N900.