14/January/2004

GNOME Network

I have been thinking for some days about GNOME Network’s reorganization, based
on the comments given when it was proposed for inclusion in GNOME 2.6, and
today, talking with
Germán,
we decided to go ahead and follow some of the advices given, if all contributors
agree and regardless of whether GNOME Network is accepted in 2.6 or not.

The plan will include, if accepted, the separation of the tools in their own
CVS modules, with their own releases and maintainers. This will avoid having
GNOME Network being a giant, unmaintainable module. The separation would be as
outlined below:

  • The desktop sharing would be in gnome-desktop-sharing module.
  • The network information tool would be in gnome-netinfo, where we could
    put also, if Mark agrees, the
    network
    status applet
    .
  • The remote shell client could even disappear, if its functionality (connect
    to remote shells via SSH/Telnet) is moved to GNOME Terminal, as was also
    suggested. There could be a “Connect to Server” item in GNOME
    Terminal’s menu that opened a dialog similar to the current remote shell
    client’s window. This (integrating it into GNOME Terminal) avoids having
    two applications for almost the same thing (opening shells).
  • The remote desktop client might need some thoughts, to be better integrated
    into the desktop. Right now, it’s a copy of the Microsoft’s terminal services
    client. I’m not sure how that integration could be done, maybe via the
    network:// virtual module, or maybe in another way yet to discover…

In any case, I think we should also concentrate on adding networking capabilities to
existing applications, instead of writing new applications for every single
feature we want. In this way, libgnetwork is a pretty good idea, once we integrate
(I hope I had more time :-( the Zeroconf stuff on it, and make applications like
Galeon, Epiphany, Nautilus, etc, use it to do service discoveries.

Mars

Nice photo
from Mars
, taken by
NASA‘s Spirit. Let’s hope
it finds British’s Beagle 2 pod, lost while landing into Mars last December.

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