anjal-settings capplet & smarter tabs

Email Settings Capplet

Thomas posted an awesome blog on GNOME/Moblin control center. Last week or so, I wrote a capplet to fit into the single-window control center. Screenshots below…

Screen1: Single window control center shell with Email setttings capplet in it.

Single window shell

Single window shell

Screen2: Anjal/Evolution account settingsScreen3: Anjal/Evolution account editor

Thanks to Matthew for the debonofication & all other refactoring, I was able to pull out the editor/settings from Evolution as a stand alone capplet. Its part of anjal source and it uses some bits from anjal which helps to get everything up and running outside the Evolution shell. Without starting Evolution users will be able to open up the account settings, and first time open will get them a druid to setup basic account and other configurations like evolution. Since the evolution accounts stored in gconf, changes to the settings via this is instantaneous even if evolution or anjal is running in the background. Beyond all of these, it reuses 99% of evolution sources and with a little shell from anjal, it just works!

Smarter Tabs

In anjal, an user can open mails in new tab or composer in a new tab from draft. Generic tab implementation, appended tabs at the end and when closed the last but 1 from the closed tab is selected. The work flow for the user would be very difficult. To fix the problem, anjal considers the following while deciding which tab to chose or where to place.

- When a tab is opened, it is placed next to a relavant tab. A email tab is placed next to the folder. Composer draft tab is placed next to draft folder tab. Rest of the tabs are appended to the end.

- When a tab is opened, its remembered from where its opened. The lastly viewed folder, or any other tab will be the one which will be opened if this is closed.

- On multiple visits, the last visit is only remembered.

Should I consider any other case? IIRC Chrome has a similar scheme.

One Comment

  1. Louise
    Posted January 21, 2010 at 2:15 am | Permalink

    Wow! That is how a control center should look like.

    The horizontal lines makes an enormous difference!