Ubuntu Developers Summit
So Wim Taymans, Tim-Philipp Müller and myself will be attending the Ubuntu Developers Summit next with in Mountain View,California. We will be there to discuss issues and opportunities for improving
multimedia support in Ubuntu and friends. We will try to attend as many of the multimedia related tracks as possible.

Elisa

Grabbed the subversion branch of Elisa yesterday in order to try to help out with cleaning up the licensing before release. The new default theme is looking really sweet and the ability of the new backend ‘pigment’ to run on any backend we want to will be a great advancement. Anyway before we release I need to go over both Elisa and Pigment and verify that all the files have a copyright header and that it is the correct ones :)

Cedega by NVidia
Discovered today that Nvidia are offering a download of Cedega
through the demo downloads site NZone. Hope its a sign that linux is becoming a gaming platform that commercial vendors have started to notice.

A Scanner Darkly
Saw the movie ‘A Scanner Darkly yesterday at the cinema. Well the animation effect was fun for the first 15 minutes, after that the fact that the movie was just extremely boring started to kick in. Considered leaving the cinema at mutiple times before it was done playing.

4 thoughts on “”

  1. Started offering cedega? They did this a long long time ago, 4.4 was well over a year ago. Simple fact is cedega isn’t upto much, the point2play interface doesn’t integrate with the shell correctly and there are hundreds of permission issues which cedega need to get over and fix, I have to run most games as root using cedega, which isn’t ideal!

    I will hopefully be supporting both cvscedega (free) and cedega through wine-doors when I eventually finish off what it is I’m currently doing with it. However nvidia want to start pushing cedega hard, hopefully wine-doors will bridge the usability/finance gap of cedega through cvscedega and winehq brands of wine.

  2. Supporting Cedega can only serve to depreciate Linux as an install target for game developers themselves. The last thing Linux needs, to be taken seriously as a gaming platform, is a context for running DX code on Linux, or Mac OS X for that matter. We need native games, not games that live in the shadow of the latest DX version. Cedega only underscores Windows as the defacto gaming platform and encourages developers to ignore portable development strategies altogether.

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