Category Archives: LibreOffice

A thank you to Google from Desktop Linux

We sometimes grumble a bit about Google in the community when they do things we feel are not generally helpful to the overall community. But I think we should be equally good at saying thanks when Google do great things. So thanks to our LibreOffice superstar Caolán McNamara I was made aware that Google has released two new open fonts along with Chrome. So what is so exciting about a new font you say?

Well one of them, called Carlito, is metrically compatible with the current MS default font called Calibri. You can get the font here. It is licensed under the OFL 1.1.

So for those wondering what metrically compatible means, I for sure did when I first heard the term, it basically mean that while the individual glyphs in the font doesn’t look like the Calibri font (that would not be legal), each individual letter has the same height and width as their Calibri counterpart. This means that if you import a document using Calibri into LibreOffice and you don’t have Calibri or a metrically compatible font installed, your document layout would change as the font LibreOffice would need to use instead have letters that might in general be slightly wider for instance. So with Carlito installed this will no longer be a problem, the glyphs might look a bit different, but you can be sure that the overall layout stays the same.

And for certain professions that can be crucial, for instance try speaking to the legal team of your company about them using LibreOffice and they are likely to tell you that they will only do that if they can feel certain that when another lawyer sends them a contract, the layout will not change when they view it, as such changes could at least potentially be the cause of a dispute over the meaning of a paragraph. (That worry was probably the main reason the legal profession stayed with Word Perfect for such a long time, when the rest of the world had moved on.)

So we are now going to get this new font packaged for Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux so soon as possible, to make your productivity experience even better :)

So thank you Google, this is much appreciated!

GUADEC, Wayland, Transmageddon and more

So GUADEC is kicking off on Thursday here in Brno. The upcoming event is creating quite a bit of excitement here in the office as many members of the Red Hat team here in Brno has been helping out with the organization of the conference this year, being in the hometown of our biggest engineering office in the world. A series of last minute meetings, calls and arriving banners and packages help create a good buzz ahead of the opening of the conference. We have managed to get a bigger contingent of the Red Hat Desktop team this year than usual, including some members of our X.org/Wayland team, our Spice team and our LibreOffice team, so it will be a great opportunity for our global team to meet face to face in addition to meeting the other members of the community.

One of the items I am looking the most forward to during this GUADEC to is to be able to talk our friends at Intel and figure out how we can effectively work together on Wayland. We have put together a team to accelerate Wayland development inside Red Hat, with the goal of getting it ready for deployment in Fedora. There are of course a lot of things that needs to happen in preparation for this, like getting the GNOME Shell ready to work as a Wayland compositor. We will be looking at a long range of items, but among the more important ones is dealing with input devices in Wayland, like handling multiple mice, touch or Wacom tablets and making sure XWayland works so well that our users will not need to realize they are using Wayland instead of X once we transition over.

Anyway, I hope to share more details on our Wayland plans in the coming weeks and Months, so stay tuned.

I have also been trying to find some spare moments during the last few weeks so that I could celebrate GUADEC here in Brno with a new release of Transmageddon. There are basically three new features I am trying to polish up currently. Handling of files with multiple audiostreams is the most important, with DVD ripping support coming in as a close second and finally being able to tag the language of the audio streams as the third one. As you might imagine the first is also a pre-requisite for the second. I am getting there, although there are still some heavy lifting to do in terms of dealing with multiple audio streams inside Transmageddon in the case where the output doesn’t support multiple audio streams, like in the case of the FLV container format or if you are just stripping off the video to make a mp3 file.

Apart from that I think git master is starting to feel like working code again, I just need to test the hell out of it to catch all regressions my code re-organisation has caused. The new features feel small in some ways, but they took an awful lot of re-factoring as they obliterated some assumptions my code made. I am also quite happy to have managed to hide these new features pretty well for people who don’t need them, so if you are just loading a normal file without multiple audio tracks the UI should look and behave almost exactly as it did before. The same is true if you don’t have a DVD player on your system, you will not get any DVD items in the UI. I still need to make the code check for the availability of the libraries it needs for DVD support since they will not be shipping by default with most distros, and thus I will check for them and only make the DVD handling features available in the UI if they are installed.

So looking forward to seeing you here in Brno in the coming days!!

Brno GUADEC Call for Papers!

I would like to give everyone a friendly reminder that Saturday the 27th of April is the official deadline for the GUADEC 2013 Call for Papers. So make sure to get your proposal submitted.

We hope to have a wide range of talks this year, including talks on related subjects such as Wayland and Multimedia, so don’t automatically assume that you will not get a talk approved because its not ‘pure GNOME’.

GUADEC this year will be in Brno in the Czech Republic, so I hope to see as many of you as possible here.

Taking on a new job at Red Hat

So I assume most of you have read Jonathan Blanfords blog post about leaving Red Hat and me taking over for him as head of the Red Hat desktop team. First of all I would like to thank Jonathan for both his contributions to GNOME and Red Hat, but also for being a good friend for over a decade now. Luckily Linux is also a major piece of his new job, so I am certain we have not seen the last of Jonathan in the community.

For the outside observer I wouldn’t expect any immediate visible changes to happen as part of this transition. My job is to follow up on the many great initiatives that Jonathan started here together with the rest of the team. One major piece I will be tackling is making sure we in the Red Hat desktop team work even closer with the Fedora community to bring forth some great improvements to Fedora and created an even more integrated and seamless experience for those wanting to use the Fedora desktop. This ranges from working with the Fedora team on a new software installer to working on getting Wayland ready for deployment in Fedora. Apart from that we will of course continue to work with the GNOME community on pushing GNOME 3 forward. I strongly recommend following Matthias Clasens blog to get the latest and greatest news on our efforts around GNOME 3.

I hope to post to my blog more frequently going forward to highlight exciting developments the many great projects the Red Hat Desktop team contribute to, like GNOME, LibreOffice, Firefox, Spice, Evolution, X Window/Wayland and more.

LibreOffice coding at Red Hat

At Red Hat we are involved with a lot of cool open source projects. One of these is the popular LibreOffice productivity Suite, where we are putting in a lot of effort to make sure Red Hat customers and the community in general have a dependable and feature rich Office Suite available.

In addition to of course doing work to add features requested by Red Hat customers, the team focuses on helping build the upstream project and making sure we help push desktop integration forward.

In fact the work done by Caolán McNamara, David Tardon, Stephan Bergmann, Michael Stahl and Eike Rathke is making Red Hat a major contributor to LibreOffice. So to celebrate the success of our team so far we wanted to have some nice t-shirts made for this years
LibreOffice conference in Berlin to give the team. It would have added a nice little touch to a conference where Caolan did a talk about his cool widget layout work (*1), Michael did a talk about the migration of LibreOffice to gbuild, Stephan did a talk about API stability and Eike did a talk about collaborative editing.

Unfortunately the t-shirts came back late from the printer and thus missed the conference, but I will be sending them out to the team today so that they have them ready for the next LibreOffice event :)

RedHat LibreOffice team t-shirt

Anyway a big thank you from me to the team, they have been a pleasure working with since I joined Red Hat and I am looking forward to seeing what we will achieve over the next years.