Re: Consider the maintainer

I’ve read this LWN article: Consider the maintainer. It was a great read, and I want to share my thoughts, from my experience on being a maintainer (or helping the maintenance) of several GNOME modules.

GNOME has a lot of existing code, but let’s face it, it has also a lot of bugs (just look at bugzilla, but the code also contains a lot of not-yet-reported bugs). For a piece of software to be successful, I’m convinced that it has to be stable, mostly bug-free. Stability is not the only property of a successful software, but without it it has way less chance to be successful in the long run (after the hype wave is gone and the harsh reality resurfaces).

There is a big difference between (a) writing a feature, but in reality it’s full of bugs, and (b) writing the same feature, but “mostly bug-free” (targeting bug-free code). It certainly takes the double of time, probably more. The last 10% of perfection are the most difficult.

Paolo Borelli likes to explain that there are two kinds of developers: the maintainers and the developers who prefer to write crazy-new-experimental features (with a gray scale in-between). It is similar with the difference between useful tasks vs interesting tasks that I talked about in a previous blog post: some useful tasks like writing unit tests are not terribly interesting to do, but I think that in general a maintainer-kind-of-developer writes more tests. And Paolo said that I’m clearly on the maintainer side, caring a lot about code quality, stability, documentation, tests, bug triaging, etc.

Reducing complexity

The key, with a lot of existing but not perfect code, is to reduce complexity:

  • Improving the coding style for better readability;
  • Doing lots of small (or less-small) refactorings;
  • Writing utility classes;
  • Extracting from a big class a set of smaller classes so that the initial class delegates some of its work;
  • Writing re-usable code, by writing a library, and documenting the classes with GTK-Doc;
  • Etc.

Even for an application, it is useful to write most of the code as an internal library, documented with GTK-Doc. Browsing the classes in Devhelp is such a nice way to discover and understand the codebase for new contributors (even if the contributor has already a lot of experience with GLib/GTK+).

Another “maintainer task” that I’ve often done: when I start contributing to a certain class, I read the whole code of that class, trying to understand every line of code, doing lots of small refactorings along the way, simplifying the code, using new GLib or GTK+ APIs, etc. When doing this exercise, I have often discovered (and fixed) bugs that were not reported in the bug tracker. Then to achieve what I wanted to do initially, with the much better knowledge of the code, I know how to do it properly, not with a quick hack to do the minimal amount of change that I sometimes see passing. As a result the code has less bugs, there is less chance to introduce new bugs, and the code is easier to understand and thus more maintainable. There is no secrets, it takes more time to do that, but the result is better.

Some books that were very useful to me:

Of course I didn’t read all those books at once, practicing is also important. I nowadays read approximately one computing science book per year.

About new contributors and code reviews

When I started to contribute to GtkSourceView several years ago, I had already developed a complete LaTeX editor based on GtkSourceView (by myself), read several of the above books (most importantly Code Complete) and applied what I learned. I had already a lot of experience with GTK+. So starting to contribute to GtkSourceView was easy, my patches were accepted easily and I think it was not too much work for the reviewers. I then became a co-maintainer.

Contrast this with all those newbies wanting to contribute to GNOME for the first time, without any experience with GLib/GTK+. They don’t even know how to contribute, how to compile the code, they probably don’t know well the command line or git, etc. So if a maintainer wants to help those newcomers, it takes a lot of time. I think this is partly a problem of documentation (that I’m trying to solve with this guide on GLib/GTK+). But even with good documentation, if the new contributor needs to learn for the first time GTK+, it will require too much time for the maintainer. What I would suggest is for newcomers to start by writing a new application on their own; for that a list of ideas of missing applications would be helpful.

This is maybe a little controversial, but the talk Consider the maintainer was also controversial, by suggesting for instance: “Maintainers should be able to say that a project is simply not accepting contributions, or to limit contributors to a small, known group of developers.”

When a company wants to hire a developer, they can choose the best candidate, or if no candidates fit they can also choose to keep the existing team as-is. In Free Software, anyone can send a patch; sometimes it takes a lot of time to explain everything and then after a short time the contributor never comes back. Remember also the well-known fact that adding people to a late project makes it later (usually, but there are exceptions).

Another interesting glimpse, from Hackers and Painters (Paul Graham):

I think this is the right model for collaboration in software too. Don’t push it too far. When a piece of code is being hacked by three or four different people, no one of whom really owns it, it will end up being like a common-room. It will tend to feel bleak and abandoned, and accumulate cruft. The right way to collaborate, I think, is to divide projects into sharply defined modules, each with a definite owner, and with interfaces between them that are as carefully designed and, if possible, as articulated as programming languages.

Other topics

I could talk about other topics, such as the lack of statistics (I don’t even know the number of people executing the code I write!) or trying to avoid sources of endless maintenance burden (example: GtkSourceView syntax highlighting definition files, the maintenance could clearly be better distributed, with one maintainer per *.lang file). But this blog post is already quite long, so I’ll not expand on those topics.

In short, there is clearly matter for thoughts and improvements in how we work, to get more things done.

This entry was posted in GtkSourceView, LaTeXila, Library development, Me Myself and I, Programming, Thoughts. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Re: Consider the maintainer

  1. swilmet says:

    Free link to the LWN article:
    https://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/712215/5f53ed12b116f496/

    Consider subscribing to LWN, it’s a great source of information. If I had to keep only one source of news for GNU/Linux, it would be LWN.

  2. Lapo says:

    Nice post, thanks for sharing

  3. slaf says:

    yeah, nice one

  4. Günther Wutz says:

    Yesterday i read the cathedral and the bazaar. Would be a perfect “read this too” for your post. Linux wouldn’t be that great if not everyone can hop on to the bandwagon. But its important to keep the code clean and documented – so a project can life on.

    • swilmet says:

      Yes indeed the cathedral and the bazaar is a good read too, more specific to open source.

      “Release early. Release often.”

      “Perfection (in design) is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but rather when there is nothing more to take away.” (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry)

      Those are the two things that I remembered the most.

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