Disrupted CVE Assignment Process

Due to an invalid TLS certificate on MITRE’s CVE request form, I have — ironically — been unable to request a new CVE for a TLS certificate verification vulnerability for a couple weeks now. (Note: this vulnerability does not affect WebKit and I’m only aware of one vulnerable application, so impact is limited; follow the link if you’re curious.) MITRE, if you’re reading my blog, your website’s contact form promises a two-day response, but it’s been almost three weeks now, still waiting.

Update May 29: I received a response today stating my request has been forwarded to MITRE’s IT department, and less than an hour later the issue is now fixed. I guess that’s score +1 for blog posts. Thanks for fixing this, MITRE.

Browser security warning on MITRE's CVE request form

Of course, the issue is exactly the same as it was five years ago, the server is misconfigured to send only the final server certificate with no chain of trust, guaranteeing failure in Epiphany or with command-line tools. But the site does work in Chrome, and sometimes works in Firefox… what’s going on? Again, same old story. Firefox is accepting incomplete certificate chains based on which websites you’ve visited in the past, so you might be able to get to the CVE request form or not depending on which websites you’ve previously visited in Firefox, but a fresh profile won’t work. Chrome has started downloading the missing intermediate certificate automatically from the issuer, which Firefox refuses to implement for fear of allowing the certificate authority to track which websites you’re visiting. Eventually, we’ll hopefully have this feature in GnuTLS, because Firefox-style nondeterministic certificate verification is nuts and we have to do one or the other to be web-compatible, but for now that is not supported and we reject the certificate. (I fear I may have delayed others from implementing the GnuTLS support by promising to implement it myself and then never delivering… sorry.)

We could have a debate on TLS certificate verification and the various benefits or costs of the Firefox vs. Chrome approach, but in the end it’s an obvious misconfiguration and there will be no further CVE requests from me until it’s fixed. (Update May 29: the issue is now fixed. :) No, I’m not bypassing the browser security warning, even though I know exactly what’s wrong. We can’t expect users to take these seriously if we skip them ourselves.

Patching Vendored Rust Dependencies

Recently I had a difficult time trying to patch a CVE in librsvg. The issue itself was simple to patch because Federico kindly backported the series of commits required to fix it to the branch we are using downstream. Problem was, one of the vendored deps in the old librsvg tarball did not build with our modern rustc, because the code contained a borrow error that was not caught by older versions of rustc. After finding the appropriate upstream fix, I tried naively patching the vendored dep, but that failed because cargo tries very hard to prevent you from patching its dependencies, and complains if the dependency does not match its checksum in Cargo.lock. I tried modifying the checksum in Cargo.lock, but then it complains that you modified the Cargo.lock. It seems cargo is designed to make patching dependencies as difficult as possible, and that not much thought was put into how cargo would be used from rpmbuild with no network access.

Anyway, it seems the kosher way to patch Rust dependencies is to add a [patch] section to librsvg’s Cargo.toml, but I could not figure out how to make that work. Eventually, I got some help: you can edit the .cargo-checksum.json of the vendored dependency and change “files” to an empty array, like so:

diff --git a/vendor/cssparser/.cargo-checksum.json b/vendor/cssparser/.cargo-checksum.json
index 246bb70..713372d 100644
--- a/vendor/cssparser/.cargo-checksum.json
+++ b/vendor/cssparser/.cargo-checksum.json
@@ -1 +1 @@
-{"files":{".cargo-ok":"e3b0c44298fc1c149afbf4c8996fb92427ae41e4649b934ca495991b7852b855",".travis.yml":"f1fb4b65964c81bc1240544267ea334f554ca38ae7a74d57066f4d47d2b5d568","Cargo.toml":"7807f16d417eb1a6ede56cd4ba2da6c5c63e4530289b3f0848f4b154e18eba02","LICENSE":"fab3dd6bdab226f1c08630b1dd917e11fcb4ec5e1e020e2c16f83a0a13863e85","README.md":"c5781e673335f37ed3d7acb119f8ed33efdf6eb75a7094b7da2abe0c3230adb8","build.rs":"b29fc57747f79914d1c2fb541e2bb15a003028bb62751dcb901081ccc174b119","build/match_byte.rs":"2c84b8ca5884347d2007f49aecbd85b4c7582085526e2704399817249996e19b","docs/.nojekyll":"e3b0c44298fc1c149afbf4c8996fb92427ae41e4649b934ca495991b7852b855","docs/404.html":"025861f76f8d1f6d67c20ab624c6e418f4f824385e2dd8ad8732c4ea563c6a2e","docs/index.html":"025861f76f8d1f6d67c20ab624c6e418f4f824385e2dd8ad8732c4ea563c6a2e","src/color.rs":"c60f1b0ab7a2a6213e434604ee33f78e7ef74347f325d86d0b9192d8225ae1cc","src/cow_rc_str.rs":"541216f8ef74ee3cc5cbbc1347e5f32ed66588c401851c9a7d68b867aede1de0","src/from_bytes.rs":"331fe63af2123ae3675b61928a69461b5ac77799fff3ce9978c55cf2c558f4ff","src/lib.rs":"46c377e0c9a75780d5cb0bcf4dfb960f0fb2a996a13e7349bb111b9082252233","src/macros.rs":"adb9773c157890381556ea83d7942dcc676f99eea71abbb6afeffee1e3f28960","src/nth.rs":"5c70fb542d1376cddab69922eeb4c05e4fcf8f413f27563a2af50f72a47c8f8c","src/parser.rs":"9ed4aec998221eb2d2ba99db2f9f82a02399fb0c3b8500627f68f5aab872adde","src/rules_and_declarations.rs":"be2c4f3f3bb673d866575b6cb6084f1879dff07356d583ca9a3595f63b7f916f","src/serializer.rs":"4ccfc9b4fe994aab3803662bbf31cc25052a6a39531073a867b14b224afe42dd","src/size_of_tests.rs":"e5f63c8c18721cc3ff7a5407e84f9889ffa10e66da96e8510a696c3e00ad72d5","src/tests.rs":"80b02c80ab0fd580dad9206615c918e0db7dff63dfed0feeedb66f317d24b24b","src/tokenizer.rs":"429b2cba419cf8b923fbcc32d3bd34c0b39284ebfcb9fc29b8eb8643d8d5f312","src/unicode_range.rs":"c1c4ed2493e09d248c526ce1ef8575a5f8258da3962b64ffc814ef3bdf9780d0"},"package":"8a807ac3ab7a217829c2a3b65732b926b2befe6a35f33b4bf8b503692430f223"}
\ No newline at end of file
+{"files":{},"package":"8a807ac3ab7a217829c2a3b65732b926b2befe6a35f33b4bf8b503692430f223"}

Then cargo will stop complaining and you can patch the dependency. Success!

Sandboxing WebKitGTK Apps

When you connect to a Wi-Fi network, that network might block your access to the wider internet until you’ve signed into the network’s captive portal page. An untrusted network can disrupt your connection at any time by blocking secure requests and replacing the content of insecure requests with its login page. (Of course this can be done on wired networks as well, but in practice it mainly happens on Wi-Fi.) To detect a captive portal, NetworkManager sends a request to a special test address (e.g. http://fedoraproject.org/static/hotspot.txt) and checks to see whether it the content has been replaced. If so, GNOME Shell will open a little WebKitGTK browser window to display http://nmcheck.gnome.org, which, due to the captive portal, will be hijacked by your hotel or airport or whatever to display the portal login page. Rephrased in security lingo: an untrusted network may cause GNOME Shell to load arbitrary web content whenever it wants. If that doesn’t immediately sound dangerous to you, let’s ask me from four years ago why that might be bad:

Web engines are full of security vulnerabilities, like buffer overflows and use-after-frees. The details don’t matter; what’s important is that skilled attackers can turn these vulnerabilities into exploits, using carefully-crafted HTML to gain total control of your user account on your computer (or your phone). They can then install malware, read all the files in your home directory, use your computer in a botnet to attack websites, and do basically whatever they want with it.

If the web engine is sandboxed, then a second type of attack, called a sandbox escape, is needed. This makes it dramatically more difficult to exploit vulnerabilities.

The captive portal helper will pop up and load arbitrary web content without user interaction, so there’s nothing you as a user could possibly do about it. This makes it a tempting target for attackers, so we want to ensure that users are safe in the absence of a sandbox escape. Accordingly, beginning with GNOME 3.36, the captive portal helper is now sandboxed.

How did we do it? With basically one line of code (plus a check to ensure the WebKitGTK version is new enough). To sandbox any WebKitGTK app, just call webkit_web_context_set_sandbox_enabled(). Ta-da, your application is now magically secure!

No, really, that’s all you need to do. So if it’s that simple, why isn’t the sandbox enabled by default? It can break applications that use WebKitWebExtension to run custom code in the sandboxed web process, so you’ll need to test to ensure that your application still works properly after enabling the sandbox. (The WebKitGTK sandbox will become mandatory in the future when porting applications to GTK 4. That’s thinking far ahead, though, because GTK 4 isn’t supported yet at all.) You may need to use webkit_web_context_add_path_to_sandbox() to give your web extension access to directories that would otherwise be blocked by the sandbox.

The sandbox is critically important for web browsers and email clients, which are constantly displaying untrusted web content. But really, every app should enable it. Fix your apps! Then thank Patrick Griffis from Igalia for developing WebKitGTK’s sandbox, and the bubblewrap, Flatpak, and xdg-desktop-portal developers for providing the groundwork that makes it all possible.

Epiphany 3.36 and WebKitGTK 2.28

So, what’s new in Epiphany 3.36?

PDF.js

Once upon a time, beginning with GNOME 3.14, Epiphany had supported displaying PDF documents via the Evince NPAPI browser plugin developed by Carlos Garcia Campos. Unfortunately, because NPAPI plugins have to use X11-specific APIs to draw web content, this didn’t  suffice for very long. When GNOME switched to Wayland by default in GNOME 3.24 (yes, that was three years ago!), this functionality was left behind. Using an NPAPI plugin also meant the code was inherently unsandboxable and tied to a deprecated technology. Epiphany disabled support for NPAPI plugins by default in Epiphany 3.30, hiding the functionality behind a hidden setting, which has now finally been removed for Epiphany 3.36, killing off NPAPI for good.

Jan-Michael Brummer, who comaintains Epiphany with me, tried bringing back PDF support for Epiphany 3.34 using libevince, but eventually we decided to give up on this approach due to difficulty solving some user experience issues. Also, the rendering occurred in the unsandboxed UI process, which was again not good for security.

But PDF support is now back in Epiphany 3.36, and much better than before! Thanks to Jan-Michael, Epiphany now supports displaying PDFs using the amazing PDF.js. We are thankful for Mozilla’s work in developing PDF.js and open sourcing it for us to use. Viewing PDFs in Epiphany using PDF.js is more convenient than downloading them and opening them in Evince, and because the PDF is rendered in the sandboxed web process, using web technologies rather than poppler, it’s also approximately one bazillion times more secure.

Screenshot of Epiphany displaying a PDF document
Look, it’s a PDF!

One limitation of PDF.js is that it does not support forms. If you need to fill out PDF forms, you’ll need to download the PDF and open it in Evince, just as you would if using Firefox.

Dark Mode

Thanks to Carlos Garcia, it should finally be possible to use Epiphany with dark GTK themes. WebKitGTK has historically rendered HTML elements using the GTK theme, which has not been good for users of dark themes, which broke badly on many websites, usually due to dark text being drawn on dark backgrounds or various other problems with unexpected dark widgets. Since WebKitGTK 2.28, WebKit will try to manually change to a light GTK theme when it thinks a dark theme is in use, then use the light theme to render web content. (This work has actually been backported to WebKitGTK 2.26.4, so you don’t need to upgrade to WebKitGTK 2.28 to benefit, but the work landed very recently and we haven’t blogged about it yet.) Thanks to Cassidy James from elementary for providing example pages for testing dark mode behavior.

Screenshot demonstrating broken dark mode support
Broken dark mode support prior to WebKitGTK 2.26.4. Notice that the first two pages use dark color schemes when light color schemes are expected, and the dark blue links are hard to read over the dark gray background. Also notice that the text in the second image is unreadable.
Screenshot demonstrating fixed dark mode support in WebKitGTK 2.26.4
Since WebKitGTK 2.26.4, dark mode works as it does in most other browsers. Websites that don’t support dark mode are light, and websites that do support dark mode are dark. Widgets themed using GTK are always light.

Since Carlos had already added support for the prefers-color-scheme media query last year, this now gets us up to dark mode parity with most browsers, except, notably, Safari. Unlike other browsers, Safari allows websites to opt-in to rendering dark system widgets, like WebKitGTK used to do before these changes. Whether to support this in WebKitGTK remains to-be-determined.

Process Swap on Navigation (PSON)

PSON, which debuted in Safari 13, is a major change in WebKit’s process model. PSON is the first component of site isolation, which Chrome has supported for some time, and which Firefox is currently working towards. If you care about web security, you should care a lot about site isolation, because the web browser community has arrived at a consensus that this is the best way to mitigate speculative execution attacks.

Nowadays, all modern web browsers use separate, sandboxed helper processes to render web content, ensuring that the main user interface process, which is unsandboxed, does not touch untrusted web content. Prior to 3.36, Epiphany already used a separate web process to display each browser tab (except for “related views,” where one tab opens another and gains scripting ability over the opened tab, subject to the Same Origin Policy). But in Epiphany 3.36, we now also have a separate web process per website. Each tab will swap between different web processes when navigating between different websites, to prevent any one web process from loading content from different websites.

To make these process swap navigations fast, a pool of prewarmed processes is used to hide the startup cost of launching a new process by ensuring the new process exists before it’s needed; otherwise, the overhead of launching a new web process to perform the navigation would become noticeable. And suspended processes live on after they’re no longer in use because they may be needed for back/forward navigations, which use WebKit’s page cache when possible. (In the page cache, pages are kept in memory indefinitely, to make back/forward navigations fast.)

Due to internal refactoring, PSON previously necessitated some API breakage in WebKitGTK 2.26 that affected Evolution and Geary: WebKitGTK 2.26 deprecated WebKit’s single web process model and required that all applications use one web process per web view, which Evolution and Geary were not, at the time, prepared to handle. We tried hard to avoid this, because we hate to make behavioral changes that break applications, but in this case we decided it was unavoidable. That was the status quo in 2.26, without PSON, which we disabled just before releasing 2.26 in order to limit application breakage to just Evolution and Geary. Now, in WebKitGTK 2.28, PSON is finally available for applications to use on an opt-in basis. (It will become mandatory in the future, for GTK 4 applications.) Epiphany 3.36 opts in. To make this work, Carlos Garcia designed new WebKitGTK APIs for cross-process communication, and used them to replace the private D-Bus server that Epiphany previously used for this purpose.

WebKit still has a long way to go to fully implement site isolation, but PSON is a major step down that road. Thanks to Brady Eidson and Chris Dumez from Apple for making this work, and to Carlos Garcia for handling most of the breakage (there was a lot). As with any major intrusive change of such magnitude, regressions are inevitable, so don’t hesitate to report issues on WebKit Bugzilla.

highlight.js

Once upon a time, WebKit had its own implementation for viewing page source, but this was removed from WebKit way back in 2014, in WebKitGTK 2.6. Ever since, Epiphany would open your default text editor, usually gedit, to display page source. Suffice to say that this was not a very satisfactory solution.

I finally managed to implement view source mode at the Epiphany level for Epiphany 3.30, but I had trouble making syntax highlighting work. I tried using various open source syntax highlighting libraries, but most are designed to highlight small amounts of code, not large web pages. The libraries I tried were not fast enough, so I gave up on syntax highlighting at the time.

Thanks to Jan-Michael, Epiphany 3.36 supports syntax highlighting using highlight.js, so we finally have view source mode working fully properly once again. It works much better than my failed attempts with different JS libraries. Please thank the highlight.js developers for maintaining this library, and for making it open source.

Screenshot displaying Epiphany's view source mode
Colors!

Service Workers

Service workers are now available in WebKitGTK 2.28. Our friends at Apple had already implemented service worker support a couple years ago for Safari 11, but we were pretty slow in bringing this functionality to Linux. Finally, WebKitGTK should now be up to par with Safari in this regard.

Cookies!

Patrick Griffis has updated libsoup and WebKitGTK to support SameSite cookies. He’s also tightened up our cookie policy by implementing strict secure cookies, which prevents http:// pages from setting secure cookies (as they could overwrite secure cookies set by https:// pages).

Adaptive Design

As usual, there are more adaptive design improvements throughout the browser, to provide a better user experience on the Librem 5. There’s still more work to be done here, but Epiphany continues to provide the best user experience of any Linux browser at small screen sizes. Thanks to Adrien Plazas and Jan-Michael for their continued work on this.

Screenshot showing Epiphany running in mobile mode at small window size.
As before, simply resize your browser window to see Epiphany dynamically transition between desktop mode and mobile mode.

elementary OS

With help from Alexander Mikhaylenko, we’ve also upstreamed many elementary OS design changes, which will be used when running under the Pantheon desktop (and not impact users on other desktops), so that the elementary developers don’t need to maintain their customizations as separate patches anymore. This will eliminate a few elementary-specific bugs, including some keyboard shortcuts that were previously broken only in elementary, and some odd tab bar behavior. Although Epiphany still doesn’t feel quite as native as an app designed just for elementary OS, it’s getting closer.

Epiphany 3.34

I failed to blog about Epiphany 3.34 when I released it last September. Hopefully you have updated to 3.34 already, and are already enjoying the two big features from this release: the new adblocker, and the bubblewrap sandbox.

The new adblocker is based on WebKit Content Blockers, which was developed by Apple several years ago. Adrian Perez developed new WebKitGTK API to expose this functionality, changed Epiphany to use it, and deleted Epiphany’s older resource-hungry adblocker that was originally copied from Midori. Previously, Epiphany kept a large GHashMap of compiled regexes in every web process, consuming a very significant amount of RAM for each process. It also took time to compile these regexes when launching each new web process. Now, the adblock filters are instead compiled into an efficient bytecode format that gets mmapped between all web processes to avoid excessive resource use. The bytecode is interpreted by WebKit itself, rather than by Epiphany’s web process extension (which Epiphany uses to execute custom code in WebKit’s web process), for greatly improved performance.

Lastly, Epiphany 3.34 enabled Patrick’s bubblewrap sandbox, which was added in WebKitGTK 2.26. Bubblewrap is an amazing sandboxing tool, already used effectively by flatpak and rpm-ostree, and I’m very pleased with Patrick’s decision to use it for WebKit as well. Because enabling the sandbox can break applications, it is currently opt-in for GTK 3 apps (but will become mandatory for GTK 4 apps). If your application uses WebKitGTK, you really need to take some time to enable this sandbox using webkit_web_context_set_sandbox_enabled(). The sandbox has introduced a couple regressions that we didn’t notice until too late; notably,  printing no longer works, which, half a year later, we still haven’t managed to fix yet. (I’ll try to get to it soon.)

OK, this concludes your 3.36 and 3.34 updates. Onward to 3.38!

Enable Git Commit Message Syntax Highlighting in Vim on Fedora

Were you looking forward to reading an exciting blog post about substantive technical issues affecting GNOME or the Linux desktop community? Sorry, not today.

When setting up new machines, I’m often frustrated by lack of syntax highlighting for git commit messages in vim. On my main workstation, vim uses comforting yellow letters for the first line of my commit message to let me know I’m good on line length, or red background to let me know my first line is too long, and after the first line it automatically inserts a new line break whenever I’ve typed past 72 characters. It’s pretty nice. I can never remember how I get it working in the end, and I spent too long today trying to figure it out yet again. Eventually I realized there was another difference besides the missing syntax highlighting: I couldn’t see the current line or column number, and I couldn’t see the mode indicator either. Now you might be able to guess my mistake: git was not using /usr/bin/vim at all! Because Fedora doesn’t have a default $EDITOR, git defaults to using /usr/bin/vi, which is basically sad trap vim. Solution:

$ git config --global core.editor vim

You also have to install the vim-enhanced package to get /usr/bin/vim, but that’s a lot harder to forget to do.

You’re welcome, Internet!

Let’s Learn Spelling!

Were you looking forward to reading an exciting blog post about substantive technical issues affecting GNOME or the Linux desktop community? Sorry, not today.

GNOME

It used to be an acronym, so it’s all uppercase. Write “GNOME,” never “Gnome.” Please stop writing “Gnome.”

Would it help if you imagine an adorable little garden gnome dying each time you get it wrong?

If you’re lazy and hate capital letters, or for technical contexts like package or project names, then all-lowercase “gnome” might be appropriate, but “Gnome” certainly never is.

Red Hat

This one’s not that hard. Why are some people writing “RedHat” without any space? It doesn’t make sense. Red Hat. Easy!

SUSE and openSUSE

S.u.S.E. and SuSE are both older spellings for the company currently called SUSE. Apparently at some point in the past they realized that the lowercase u was stupid and causes readers’ eyes to bleed.  Can we please let it die?

Similarly, openSUSE is spelled “openSUSE,” not “OpenSUSE.” Do not capitalize the o, even if it’s the first word in a sentence. Do not write “openSuSE” or “OpenSuSE” (which people somehow manage to do even when they’re not trolling) or anything at all other than “openSUSE.” I know this is probably too much to ask, but once you get the hang of it, it’s not so hard.

elementary OS

I don’t often see this one messed up. If you can write elementary OS, you can probably write openSUSE properly too! They’re basically the same structure, right? All lowercase, then all caps. I have faith in you, dear reader! Don’t let me down!

GTK and WebKitGTK

We removed the + from the end of both of these, because it was awful. You’re welcome!

Again, all lowercase is probably OK in technical contexts. “gtk-webkit” is not. WebKitGTK.

Epiphany Technology Preview Users: Action Required

Epiphany Technology Preview has moved from https://sdk.gnome.org to https://nightly.gnome.org. The old Epiphany Technology Preview is now end-of-life. Action is required to update. If you installed Epiphany Technology Preview prior to a couple minutes ago, uninstall it using GNOME Software and then reinstall using this new flatpakref.

Apologies for this disruption.

The main benefit to end users is that you’ll no longer need separate remotes for nightly runtimes and nightly applications, because everything is now hosted in one repo. See Abderrahim’s announcement for full details on why this transition is occurring.

WebKit Vulnerabilities Facilitate Human Rights Abuses

Chinese state actors have recently abused vulnerabilities in the JavaScriptCore component of WebKit to hack the personal computing devices of Uighur Muslims in the Xinjiang region of China. Mass digital surveillance is a key component of China’s ongoing brutal human rights crackdown in the region.

This has resulted in a public relations drama that is largely a distraction to the issue at hand. Whatever big-company PR departments have to say on the matter, I have no doubt that the developers working on WebKit recognize the severity of this incident and are grateful to Project Zero, which reported these vulnerabilities and has previously provided numerous other high-quality private vulnerability reports. (Many other organizations deserve credit for similar reports, especially Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative.)

WebKit as a project will need to reassess certain software development practices that may have facilitated the abuse of these vulnerabilities. The practice of committing security fixes to open source long in advance of corresponding Safari releases may need to be reconsidered.

Sadly, Uighurs should assume their personal computing devices have been compromised by state-sponsored attackers, and that their private communications are not private. Even if not compromised in this particular incident, similar successful attacks are overwhelmingly likely in the future.

On Version Numbers

I’m excited to announce that Epiphany Tech Preview has reached version 3.33.3-33, as computed by git describe. That is 33 commits after 3.33.3:

Epiphany about dialog displaying the version number

I’m afraid 3.33.4 will arrive long before we  make it to 3.33.3-333, so this is probably the last cool version number Epiphany will ever have.

I might be guilty of using an empty commit to claim the -33 commit.

I might also apologize for wasting your time with a useless blog post, except this was rather fun. I await the controversy of your choice in the comments.

An OpenJPEG Surprise

My previous blog post seems to have resolved most concerns about my requests for Ubuntu stable release updates, but I again received rather a lot of criticism for the choice to make WebKit depend on OpenJPEG, even though my previous post explained clearly why there are are not any good alternatives.

I was surprised to receive a pointer to ffmpeg, which has its own JPEG 2000 decoder that I did not know about. However, we can immediately dismiss this option due to legal problems with depending on ffmpeg. I also received a pointer to a resurrected libjasper, which is interesting, but since libjasper was removed from Ubuntu, its status is not currently better than OpenJPEG.

But there is some good news! I have looked through Ubuntu’s security review of the OpenJPEG code and found some surprising results. Half the reported issues affect the library’s companion tools, not the library itself. And the other half of the issues affect the libmj2 library, a component of OpenJPEG that is not built by Ubuntu and not used by WebKit. So while these are real security issues that raise concerns about the quality of the OpenJPEG codebase, none of them actually affect OpenJPEG as used by WebKit. Yay!

The remaining concern is that huge input sizes might cause problems within the library that we don’t yet know about. We don’t know because OpenJPEG’s fuzzer discards huge images instead of testing them. Ubuntu’s security team thinks there’s a good chance that fixing the fuzzer could uncover currently-unknown multiplication overflow issues, for instance, a class of vulnerability that OpenJPEG has clearly had trouble with in the past. It would be good to see improvement on this front. I don’t think this qualifies as a security vulnerability, but it is certainly a security problem that would facilitate discovering currently-unknown vulnerabilities if fixed.

Still, on the whole, the situation is not anywhere near as bad as I’d thought. Let’s hope OpenJPEG can be included in Ubuntu main sooner rather than later!