Announcing Appstream-Glib

For a few years now Appstream and AppData adoption has been growing. We’ve got client applications like GNOME Software consuming the XML files, and we’ve got several implementations of metadata generators for a few distros now. We’ve also got validation tools we’re encouraging upstream applications to use.

The upshot of this was the same code was being duplicated across 3 different projects of mine, all with different namespaces and slightly different defined names. Untangling this mess took a good chunk of last week, and I’ve factored out 2759 lines of code from gnome-software, 4241 lines from createrepo_as, and the slightly less impressive 178 lines from appdata-tools.

The new library has a simple homepage, and so far a single release. I’d encourage people to check this out and provide early comments, as as soon as gnome-software branches for 3-12 I’m going to switch it to using this. I’m also planning on switching createrepo_as and and appdata-tools for the next releases too so things like jhbuild modulesets need to be updated and tested by somebody.

Appstream-Glib 0.1.0 provides just enough API to make sense for a first release, but I’m going to be continuing to abstract out useful functionality from the other projects to share even more code. I’ve spent a few long nights profiling the XML parsing code, and I’m pleased to say the load time of gnome-software is 160ms faster with this new library, and createrepo_as completes the metadata generation 4 minutes faster. Comments, suggestions and patches very welcome. There’s a Fedora package linked from the package review bug if you’d rather test that. Thanks.

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Richard has over 10 years of experience developing open source software. He is the maintainer of GNOME Software, PackageKit, GNOME Packagekit, GNOME Power Manager, GNOME Color Manager, colord, and UPower and also contributes to many other projects and opensource standards. Richard has three main areas of interest on the free desktop, color management, package management, and power management. Richard graduated a few years ago from the University of Surrey with a Masters in Electronics Engineering. He now works for Red Hat in the desktop group, and also manages a company selling open source calibration equipment. Richard's outside interests include taking photos and eating good food.