fwupdate is {nearly} dead; long live fwupd

If the title confuses you, you’re not the only one that’s been confused with the fwupdate and fwupd project names. The latter used the shared library of the former to schedule UEFI updates, with the former also providing the fwup.efi secure-boot signed binary that actually runs the capsule update for the latter.

In Fedora the only user of libfwupdate was fwupd and the fwupdate command line tool itself. It makes complete sense to absorb the redundant libfwupdate library interface into the uefi plugin in fwupd. Benefits I can see include:

  • fwupd and fwupdate are very similar names; a lot of ODMs and OEMs have been confused, especially the ones not so Linux savy.
  • fwupd already depends on efivar for other things, and so there are no additional deps in fwudp.
  • Removal of an artificial library interface, with all the soname and package-induced pain. No matter how small, maintaining any project is a significant use of resources.
  • The CI and translation hooks are already in place for fwupd, and we can use the merging of projects as a chance to write lots of low-level tests for all the various hooks into the system.
  • We don’t need to check for features or versions in fwupd, we can just develop the feature (e.g. the BGRT localised background image) all in one branch without #ifdefs everwhere.
  • We can do cleverer things whilst running as a daemon, for instance uploading the fwup.efi to the ESP as required rather than installing it as part of the distro package.
    • The last point is important; several distros don’t allow packages to install files on the ESP and this was blocking fwupdate being used by them. Also, 95% of the failures reported to the LVFS are from Arch Linux users who didn’t set up the ESP correctly as the wiki says. With this new code we can likely reduce the reported error rate by several orders of magnitude.

      Note, fwupd doesn’t actually obsolete fwupdate, as the latter might still be useful if you’re testing capsule updates on something super-embedded that doesn’t ship Glib or D-Bus. We do ship a D-Bus-less fwupdate-compatible command line in /usr/libexec/fwupd/fwupdate if you’re using the old CLI from a shell script. We’re all planning to work on the new integrated fwupd version, but I’m sure they’ll be some sharing of fixes between the projects as libfwupdate is shipped in a lot of LTS releases like RHEL 7.

      All of this new goodness is available in fwupd git master, which will be the new 1.1.0 release probably available next week. The 1_0_X branch (which depends on libfwupdate) will be maintained for a long time, and is probably the better choice to ship in LTS releases at the moment. Any distros that ship the new 1.1.x fwupd versions will need to ensure that the fwup.efi files are signed properly if they want SecureBoot to work; in most cases just copying over the commands from the fwupdate package is all that is required. I’ll be updating Fedora Rawhide with the new package as soon as it’s released.

      Comments welcome.

Published by

hughsie

Richard has over 10 years of experience developing open source software. He is the maintainer of GNOME Software, PackageKit, GNOME Packagekit, GNOME Power Manager, GNOME Color Manager, colord, and UPower and also contributes to many other projects and opensource standards. Richard has three main areas of interest on the free desktop, color management, package management, and power management. Richard graduated a few years ago from the University of Surrey with a Masters in Electronics Engineering. He now works for Red Hat in the desktop group, and also manages a company selling open source calibration equipment. Richard's outside interests include taking photos and eating good food.

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