Positive progress on WebKitGTK+ security updates

I previously reported that, although WebKitGTK+ releases regular upstream security updates, most Linux distributions are not taking the updates. At the time, only Arch Linux and Fedora were reliably releasing our security updates. So I’m quite pleased that openSUSE recently released a WebKitGTK+ security update, and then Mageia did too. Gentoo currently has an update in the works. It remains to be seen if these distros regularly follow up on updates (expect a follow-up post on this in a few months), but, optimistically, you now have several independent distros to choose from to get an updated version WebKitGTK+, plus any distros that regularly receive updates directly from these distros.

Unfortunately, not all is well yet. It’s still not safe to use WebKitGTK+ on the latest releases of Debian or Ubuntu, or on derivatives like Linux Mint, elementary OS, or Raspbian. (Raspbian is notable because it uses an ancient, insecure version of Epiphany as its default web browser, and Raspberry Pis are kind of popular.)

And of course, no distribution has been able to get rid of old, insecure WebKitGTK+ 2.4 compatibility packages, so many applications on distributions that do provide security updates for modern WebKitGTK+ will still be insecure. (Don’t be fooled by the recent WebKitGTK+ 2.4.10 update; it contains only a few security fixes that were easy to backport, and was spurred by the need to add GTK+ 3.20 compatibility. It is still not safe to use.) Nor have distributions managed to remove QtWebKit, which is also old and insecure. You still need to check individual applications to see if they are running safe versions of WebKit.

But at least there are now several distros providing WebKitGTK+ security updates. That’s good.

Special thanks to Apple and to my colleagues at Igalia for their work on the security advisories that motivate these updates.

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