Category Archives: Photography

Spring Cleaning

Interesting to see Agave featured prominently in the screenshots for ubuntu studio. (That site might be down, it doesn’t seem to be withstanding the traffic very well).

Things with nemiver are coming along at a decent pace and we’ll probably be doing another release in the near future. The next release should bring quite a few nice new features and a lot of bugfixes, most of which Dodji has already mentioned.

I recently bought a new Digital SLR camera, the Nikon D40. I wasn’t necessarily looking for the best camera I could find, just something reasonably priced that took decent pictures. The D40 is relatively small so I don’t feel like I’m lugging a huge camera around (which is important or I probably wouldn’t end up using it as much), it’s cheap (it comes with a reasonable lens kit for around 600 US, which isn’t much more than I paid for my old point-and-shoot digital back in the day), and it takes vastly better pictures than my old camera. I’m really loving the fact that I can actually get decent pictures even if the lighting and environment is less than ideal. I’d highly recommend it if you’re looking for a decent entry-level DSLR. I still clearly have a lot to learn about photography (this camera just lets me take better-looking crappy photos). But I’m slowly learning, and I’m getting lots of practice, like any new parent.

GNOME Developer Tools

I feel like my GNOME development environment is finally becoming really comfortable. This weekend, while working a little bit on Agave, I ran into a couple issues, and fired up Nemiver to debug the problems. Then I made the commit using giggle.

In the past, I’ve used GNOME applications for web browsing, checking email, viewing images, listening to music, and all of my other day-to-day computer activities. But I’ve never really had any GNOME tools that I’ve been able to use for development. It feels like we’re finally making progress on some good basic development tools for GNOME, which makes me really happy. In addition to the ones I mentioned, there’s also some really great stuff happening in the new versions of glade3, and there seems to be some good stuff happening in Anjuta as well (though I don’t personally use an IDE). All in all, I’m pretty positive about the future of developer tools in GNOME.

In other news, Ruby is still the-cutest-baby-everâ„¢ and doing really well. We’re even getting some decent sleep (though decent is pretty relative I suppose).