Open Help Conference 2015 Hackfest Wrap Up Notes

Wrap up notes for the Open Help Conference 2015 GNOME Documentation Hackfest, Cincinnati, OH, September 28 – 30, 2015.

The hackfest was held at a lovely co-working place called Platform 53 in Covington, Kentucky, just across the river from downtown Cincinnati. During the three intensive days full of writing, the docs team managed to update tons of pages throughout GNOME Help.

  • Due to the timing of the 3.18.0 stable release, the updates, together with some updated translations, eventually landed in 3.18.1.
  • I mostly focused on updating user account, power, and printing help. These should be in a good shape now. There are exceptions, though, like documentation on enterprise login, which is pending some code-related updates.
  • Some of us struggled with getting a 3.18.0 up and running. We tried different build images from GNOME Continuous, Fedora, and openSUSE. While there seems to be a plenty of options at first glance, when it comes to being able to try out and preview the actual GNOME Desktop, I think there is still a long way to go.
  • Testing some of the cool features in 3.18 can get challenging, for example, automatic screen brightness that requires an integrated light sensor. I wish I had one!
  • I managed to get the Getting Started module in sync with most of the updates that landed in GNOME Help. Meanwhile, Jakub has been working on a different approach to Getting Started animations.
  • The team had a profound discussion about restructuring some of the most visible topics and topic groups in GNOME Help. We made good progress, although some of the issues, including content duplicity, remain unresolved. Material for the next hackfest?
  • Shaun organized a team building event for us, we watched a baseball game at Great American Ball Park. Cincinnati  Reds!

Big thanks to Shaun & Kat for organizing the hackfest, and the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring me!

View from Platform 53 towards Downtown Cincinnati.
View from Platform 53 towards Downtown Cincinnati.
The ball game in Cincinnati.
The baseball game in Cincinnati.

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Notes from L10n-i18n-Docs BoF

Although this somewhat slipped through the cracks, it’s never too late to socialize the notes taken by Nuritzi Sanchez of Endless Mobile fame during the L10n-i18n-Docs BoF we ran at GUADEC 2015 (many thanks for taking them!).

The notes for the GTP (translation) part are here:

https://wiki.gnome.org/TranslationProject/GUADEC2015NOTES

And the documentation part notes are here:

https://wiki.gnome.org/DocumentationProject/GUADEC2015Notes

In a nutshell, the BoF attendees, both translators and documentation writers, touched a number topics spanning from screenshot automation (a follow-up from previous year’s BoF) to onboarding, mentoring and improving the projects’ getting started material for contributors, to glossaries, style guides and similar resources.

If you are interested in any of those topics, please have a look.

Hope the notes can be reused as follow-ups in future i18n and/or docs meetings.

Open Help Conference 2015

I’m here again in Cincinnati, OH for the 2015 Open Help Conference and GNOME Docs hackfest. The venue for this year’s conference is at the beautiful Mercantile Library in downtown Cincinnati.

20150926_09091820150926_095604The area around Cincinnati has a strong German heritage, so no wonder the library also features some German manuscripts. Reminds me of my years spent studying paleography.

20150926_12185120150926_095630The Open Help Conference is not like one of those industry conferences with large numbers of participants but the attendees here are, on the other hand, very focused on the specific topic of open source documentation and docs community management. It’s always cool to see how other communities approach community docs, and learn some new tricks along the way.

20150926_12195420150926_121324Great to see old faces again, and meet new ones. I’d like to thank the GNOME Foundation for making it possible for me to attend the conference and hackfest.

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2015 Winter Docs Hackfest

I’m here in lovely Cambridge for the winter GNOME docs hackfest. This time, the docs team is sharing a room with the Developer Experience (DX) hackfest, which provides us with a great opportunity to reach out to GNOME developers for expert’s advice.

Yesterday, Christian Hergert presented a new GNOME IDE in development, called Builder:

Builder comes with a feature-rich text editor that can also be useful for documentation writers who often author documents in XML.

Cosimo Cecchi showed us some of the downstream changes the Endless team made to gnome-user-docs and gnome-getting-started-docs. For me, personally, the most interesting part was their feedback on the GNOME docs style and content. Endless seem to target their product to a slightly different customer, still, they appear to have data on their users that the upstream project lacks. The GNOME help suite, written by different authors and in different style over the course of many years, is actually targeted at multiple audiences, spanning from quite inexperienced desktop end-users to skilled users who need to troubleshoot VMs in GNOME Boxes.

Shaun McCance showcased some of the cool features of Ducktype, a new lightweight syntax for Mallard. Although still a work in progress, this new syntax brings to the world of Mallard docs the flexibility of formats such as AsciiDoc or Markdown, which are now gaining strong popularity in both the developer and technical communication communities.

The docs team focused on squashing the bugs filed against GNOME Help and application help, and on content improvements in different areas of the desktop documentation stack. Jim Campbell worked on changing the structure and layout of Files help. He also worked with Jana Svarova on VPN docs for the GNOME sysadmin guide. Jana went through the docs feedback ML archives, responding to user comments and filing new bugs. Kat worked on application help with Jim and fixed a couple of bugs in gnome-user-docs. I worked on triaging docs bugs, and then on reviewing and updating some parts of GNOME Help and the sysadmin guide.

I would like to thank Collabora for providing the venue and catering, Kat and Philip Withnall for running the hackfests, and the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring me.

It’s been great to see old and new faces from the community, now off to Brussels for FOSDEM, then back to Brno for DevConf!

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L10n & Docs at GUADEC 2014

At this year’s GUADEC, there will be a number of sessions relevant to people interested in GNOME localization and documentation:

  • On Monday, Kat will give an update from the docs team called Documentation: state of the union. Her talk will detail what has happened in the documentation realm since GUADEC 2013, so be sure to attend.
  • Team Reports on Saturday will include localization and documentation.
  • There will be a screenshot automation BoF on July 30th. Vadim Rutkovsky from Red Hat’s Desktop QE has some sweet surprise for you, translators!
  • Finally, on July 30th and 3Ist, Daiki Ueno and Alexandre Franke are planning to organize an i18n hackfest to work on translation tools, spellcheckers, dictionaries, input methods, and related fields.

I’ll be arriving tomorrow evening with Christian Schaller and other desktop people from Red Hat Czech and leaving on the 31st – hope to see you all in Strasbourg!

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Open Help Conference 2014

This is a belated post on the Open Help Conference in Cincinnati, OH that I had the chance (thanks for sponsoring me, Red Hat!) to attend this year. It took place from June 14-15 at a nice venue provided by Garfield Suites Hotel. The Conference was followed by the GNOME Docs Sprint from June 16-18.

The Open Help Conference is much smaller in attendance than some of the large industry conferences for technical writers out there. This actually allows the attendees to actively participate in many talks and discussions, similarly to what you can usually experience at unconferences. It was the Conference’s primary focus on docs communities that made attending each of the sessions very relevant to those of us who work on open source documentation.

Along with people representing other open source companies and communities (this included Eric Shepherd from Mozilla or Michael Downey from OpenMRS), there were also two fellow Red Hatters attending (Rich Bowen and David King). We had quite a few people from GNOME Docs, too. The Conference was organized by Shaun McCance who did a fantastic job running the whole event as he found time not only to take care of the venue and catering, but also of the social events on both conference days that took place in his lovely hometown of Cincinnati. Thanks again, Shaun!

You can check #openhelp and Michael Downey’s excellent notes to learn more about the different talks and sessions held at OH.

Open Help Conference 2014 Hackfest

The Open Help Conference 2014 Hackfest followed an unwritten tradition in the GNOME Documentation Project of having two GNOME docs hackfests or sprints annually. Unlike the sprint held earlier this year in Norwich, UK where the team worked mostly on updating the user help for the upcoming GNOME 3.12 release, the Cincinnati hackfest focused on finishing the GNOME System Administration Guide. We managed to completely rework the overall structure of the guide and redesigned the index page for the guide, following the earlier design mockups prepared for GNOME Help by Allan Day.

The restructured System Administration Guide now features the following main groups of topics:

  • User Settings (Lockdown, Pre-seed user defaults, Pre-seed email/calendar/groupware, Appearance, Setup)
  • Login Settings (Appearance, Session, Management)
  • Network (NetworkManager, etc.)
  • Software (Apps, Extensions, Management)
  • Troubleshooting / diagnosis

More details can be found on the Guide planning page.

Other things that caught my attention during the conference:

Duck Pages

Shaun’s plans for the future include an additional input format for Mallard-based documentation – so called Duck pages. A Duck page is essentially a plain text format based on Mallard XML that doesn’t use the often distracting XML syntax. Duck pages should make it easy to author single-sourced topic-based documentation with a Markdown or AsciiDoc-like syntax. Unlike Markdown and others, Duck pages aim to not only allow for quick creation of rich-formatted docs, but also to contain data necessary to integrate the document with the rest of your Mallard-based documents.

Blip

Shaun also presented another tool that he has been working on: Blip. It is a web application to monitor documentation projects that use SCM repositories. Some examples include:

Blip lets you not only browse through individual modules in your documentation project, but it also mines data to present information about contributors, their commit or mailing list activity, and much more.

  • An example of a project profile with complete data on branches, commits, authors, included documents, and more: Gnome User Documentation
  • An example of of a user profile with personal stats: Shaun McCance

GNOME Docs Hackfest 2014, Norwich, Day 2

Today is the second day of the GNOME Documentation Hackfest 2014. A group of community documentation writers is here in rainy Norwich, UK to work on getting GNOME’s help updated for the upcoming 3.12 release.

Today I am going through the bugs filed against the system-admin-guide in gnome-user-docs, and putting together a list of topics that are not yet updated or covered in that guide. Andre already updated or closed many of the bugs (thanks, mate!), so the bug pile for the guide now looks slightly better.

There is also some not-yet-upstreamed system administration material written for GNOME 3.8 and RHEL7 Beta that we published as a part of RHEL7 Beta product documentation. Since the 3.8 upstream release, there have not been many major changes in terms of what we want to have covered in the GNOME system admin guide, so I will be syncing our downstream docs with the upstream guide and updating the docs as needed. The goal is to release a reasonably complete system administration guide for GNOME 3.12, mostly following the outline detailed on the original planning page.

The hackfest wiki page highlights some of the other areas that we plan to work on this week.

I would like to thank Kat & Dave for organizing the hackfest and letting us stay at theirs for the week. Thank you so much! I would also like to thank the University of East Anglia for providing the venue, and the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring me to be here.

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GUADEC 2013 in Brno

Today was the last conference day of GUADEC 2013 and I have to say that being involved in the conference organization and volunteering has been an amazing experience. I want to thank my fellow organizers, our volunteers and all the people who offered their help to make GUADEC in Brno happen. You were great!

This year’s program included a number of talks related to community outreach and documentation. On Thursday, Kat and Sindhu talked about how to get involved in community efforts such as the GNOME Docs. At the Newcomers Workshop organized by Marina and others, I had a chance to meet our newest member of the Czech localization team. Our team, just like pretty much any other, needs fresh blood, so I was more that happy to see so many newcomers attending GUADEC, including those who are also interested in other aspects of the project than just coding.

At the GNOME Foundation AGM on Friday, Sindhu gave an update on GNOME documentation and I talked about what GNOME Localization has been up to since the last GUADEC in A Coruna.

Kat gave a talk on documentation on the third day. Later that day, we had a lightning talk session and I talked a bit about Getting Started video tutorials that we introduced in GNOME 3.8. Today, Marta gave a presentation on the developer tutorial for GTK+, followed by Jeff Fortin who gave a talk on PiTiVi and showed us some really funny videos.

It’s probably needless to say that conferences like GUADEC are special in that you can finally meet in person other members of the teams that you are involved in. Seeing familiar and new faces is always nice.

Next week

Next week we plan to have a docs hackfest, which will be focusing on the GNOME Desktop System Administration Guide. GNOME translators also plan to discuss some hot topics in GNOME i18n, such as broken translations for the gnome.org website, a l10n workflow for translating Git submodules, auto-committing translation files to GNOME Git repos etc. One of the outstanding issues we had appears to be already fixed – big kudos to Matthias for that.

If you are interested in GNOME docs or l10n, be sure to join us for the shared docs & l10n session we will have on the morning of the 6th. So, see you next week!

GNOME Localization Update for Q2 2012

During Q2 2012, the GNOME translation teams mainly focused on the GNOME 3.4.x minor releases. Some teams also started working on the next major release 3.6 due in September.

In April 2012, there were 1397 translation commits to git.gnome.org as per the GNOME Commit-Digest. In May 2012, there were 1138 translation commits, and in June 2012, there were 1203 translation commits.

Some other interesting stats on the l10n.gnome.org localization platform include:

  • 131 registered teams,
  • 177 registered languages and language variants,
  • 353 registered software modules,
  • ca. 40700 UI strings for translation in the GNOME 3.4 release set,
  • ca. 23100 doc strings for translation in the GNOME 3.4 release set,
  • ca. 532000 UI strings for translation in all registered modules,
  • ca. 268300 doc strings for translation in all registered modules.

Note that these numbers are based on the current state (October) as there is no easy way to track the past quarter in our l10n platform.

During Q2, the gtranslator PO editor also saw some improvements in translation memory management, plural forms handling, etc.

Damned Lies Developers

As many people around the GNOME Translation Project know, we are in need of new developers who are willing to work on our translation platform Damned Lies to fix various bugs that we are fighting with, and hack on new features.

Gil Forcada, who was recently added to Planet GNOME (welcome!), also posted some wonderful news about possible new contributors who, if all goes well, will start working on Damned Lies in the near future. Read more on Gil’s blog.