Translation BoF at GUADEC: Pictures

Gil, Andre and Rūdolfs already blogged about Monday’s Translation BoF / meeting at GUADEC 2012. We had quite a few items on our agenda list to discuss as you can see from the output of our brainstorming session on this wiki page put together by Gil.

Around ten people attended the meeting, with a (not so) surprisingly strong presence of Galician translators. All in all, this was an excellent opportunity to meet other GNOME translators in person after we have been working together on the same translation project for several years.

Enough said, let’s have a look at some pictures now.

Pictures taken by Florian – thanks!

And big thanks to the GUADEC 2012 organizers who really did an excellent job! They surely set high standards for the GUADECs to follow. So, see you in Brno or Stuttgart next year! ;-)

 

Translation BoF at GUADEC 2012

The GUADEC 2012 program was recently published, so it’s time to announce that the GNOME Translation Project BoF proposal was accepted by the organizers (thanks!).

The GNOME Translation Project BoF/Meeting will be held at GUADEC 2012 in A Coruna, Spain on July 30, room 2.2b. The meeting starts at 10:00 am. Everybody is welcome to attend!

See the following page for detailed BoFs schedule:

https://live.gnome.org/GUADEC/2012/BOFs

The BoF/Meeting wiki page with a proposed agenda is at:

https://live.gnome.org/TranslationProject/Events

Please feel free to edit the Events wiki page and share your ideas on what topics we should focus on during the meeting.

See you at GUADEC!

GUADEC 2012

GNOME Localization Update for Q1 2012

During Q1 2012, GNOME translation teams worked on the GNOME 3.4 localization. The GNOME 3.4.0 stable release was delivered on March 28. According to the GNOME 3.4 Release Notes, GNOME 3.4.0 offers support for more than 50 languages with at least 80 percent of strings translated, including documentation for many languages.

When comparing the completeness of the GNOME 3.2 and 3.4 localization, the following translation teams, among others, achieved some impressive progress:

  • Khmer team increased the translation completeness by 23%.
  • Macedonian team increased the translation completeness by 21%.
  • Canadian English team increased the translation completeness by 13%.

In January 2012, there were 1139 translation commits to git.gnome.org as per the GNOME Commit-Digest. In February 2012, there were 1483 translation commits, and in March 2012, there were 3283 translation commits suggesting that many translators were finishing their work on GNOME 3.4 during the string freeze period, which started on March 5.

Some of the other interesting stats on the l10n.gnome.org localization platform include:

  • 128 registered teams.
  • 178 registered languages and language variants.
  • 349 registered software modules.
  • ca. 41000 UI strings for translation in the GNOME 3.4 release set.
  • ca. 21904 doc strings for translation in the GNOME 3.4 release set.
  • ca. 500800 UI strings for translation in all registered modules.
  • ca. 253900 doc strings for translation in all registered modules.

The gtranslator team released several versions of the gtranslator translation editor during Q1 2012. The new versions introduce a number of feature enhancements, including support for non-UTF-8 files, more integration with the GNOME 3 platform, and better translation memory support.

Pan 0.136 is far too busy being delicious

Good news for those still using News (as in Newsgroups, Usenet, and Newsreaders): a new release of the GNOME/GTK+ newsreader Pan is out.  Special thanks to Heinrich Müller for putting tremendous effort into making this possible.

The Pan 0.136: “Far too busy being delicious…” release introduces a plethora of bug fixes and improvements over the previous release, so everybody using older versions of Pan is encouraged to upgrade. Among the new features, you can find: attachments uploading, TLS (SSL) connections, PGP handling, and so on.

Read the official announcement or download Pan and test it to pieces.

And for those of you who haven’t had a chance to meet Judge Fudge yet, take a look here.

GNOME Localization Update for Q4 2011

Totally forgot to post the report here, so doing it now.

During Q4 2011, GNOME language teams worked on translating GNOME apps and docs into tens of supported languages in the stable GNOME 3.2.x and the development GNOME 3.3.x branches.

Several GNOME language teams participated in the Google Code-in 2011 program. This program is for 13-17 year old high school students working on a number of tasks related to localization, documentation, development, and other areas of interest. The program ran from November 21, 2011 to January 16, 2012.

Two GNOME language teams took part in the 2011 GNOME Women Outreach Program, the Belarus team with Kasia Bondarava (kasia) as the intern and Ihar Hrachyshka as her mentor, and the Xhosa team with Andiswa Mvanyashe (andiswa) as the intern and Friedel Wolff as her mentor. The Outreach Program ran from September 16, 2011 to March 12, 2012.

Brno Doc Sprint Update

If you are contributing to GNOME documentation, probably you already read about the Brno Doc Sprint (and the Developer Conference) that takes place in Brno, February 17-21, 2012, at the Faculty of Informatics at Masaryk University (from February 17-18) and at the Red Hat Czech Office (from February 19-21).

For those of you attending this documentation event, the organizers have special arrangements with one of the hotels near both doc sprint venues to provide the attendees a discounted rate. See the Developer Conference wiki page for more details.

To be able to receive the discounted rate, please confirm your attendance by January 9, 2012 on the doc sprint wiki page.

Please also remember to fill in your arrival and depart dates, and, since the special rate is for double-bed rooms, your roommate.

See you all in Brno!

The Developer Conference 2012 poster

Czech translations and Google Code-in 2011

This year, the GNOME Czech Translation Team officially participates in the Google Code-in program for pre-university students ages 13-18. I joined the GNOME mentors group and submitted four tasks so that students can help our team with updating GNOME 3.4 translations for gnome-system-monitor and seahorse’s UI, and brasero and file-roller’s documentation.

The full announcement in Czech was posted to the Czech translation team mailing list.

Great news is that one of the tasks has been already claimed by a student. But if you know anybody interested and suitable to participate in the program, or if you’re a Czech-speaking student yourself, don’t hesitate and claim your task today! Just keep in mind that all works stop on January 16, 2012.

From looking at the list of tasks submitted for the GNOME Project, it’s very pleasing to see that there are several GNOME translation teams also taking part in the program, besides other, perhaps more usual tasks oriented on coding, documentation, etc.

Big thanks goes to our Czech teammate André Klapper for providing me with some useful information and, above all, for coordinating the whole effort from the GNOME end.

And, obviously, big thanks to Google for organizing this program.

GNOME Localization Update for Q3 2011

During Q3, GNOME localization teams efforts were focused mainly on delivering translation support for the GNOME 3.2 release, which was shipped on September 28. In this release, there were more than 50 languages with at least 80 percent of strings translated, including the user and administration guides.

One of the participants in the GNOME Outreach Program for Women that took place from May 23 to August 22, Priscilla Mahlangu, completed the first localization intern in the history of the program after working on Zulu translations with Friedel Wolff as her mentor. As a result, she managed to improve Zulu localization from ca. 4 percent of translated strings to ca. 10 percent.

As the first team ever, the Spanish team was able to complete the translation of the official GIMP documentation, thanks to the work done by a Spanish translator, Ignacio AntI.

Thanks to the contributions from Claude Paroz and Gil Forcada, the GNOME localization platform Damned Lies, running on l10n.gnome.org, saw a number of improvements in this quarter, including work on implementing support for word statistics.

GNOME Localization Update for Q2 2011

During Q2 2011 GNOME localization teams continued their work on adding and updating translations for the modules that are hosted at GNOME and make use of the GNOME i18n infrastructure.

Claude Paroz worked with Shaun McCance on a new help build system which is based on ITS Tool and is supposed to replace the currently used xml2po utility in the near future.

Furthermore, with the necessary support from the GNOME Documentation Project, GNOME translators started their work on translating the new GNOME User Documentation that was written in Mallard and is using the new help build system.

Also in this quarter, as part of the GNOME Outreach Program for Women internships, Priscilla Mahlangu began her work on the Zulu localization of the GNOME Desktop with Friedel Wolff as her mentor.

GNOME Localization Update for Q1 2011

During this quarter, GNOME translation teams worked on delivering localization support for GNOME 3, which was released on April 4 with more than 50 fully supported languages. In comparison to previous development cycles, the road to the GNOME 3.0.0 release was marked with many string freeze breaks that occurred very late in the cycle so that translation teams had to put extra effort into delivering high quality GNOME translations.

GNOME translators also worked on localization support for additional marketing resources related to GNOME 3, including the gnome3.org website.

In preparation for the 3.0.0 release, there was a module set reorganization done in Damned LiesGNOME 3.0 release set in order to better match the gnome-3.0 module set as maintained in JHBuild. Possible ways on how to further improve the GNOME modules representation in Damned Lies were discussed in the gnome-i18n mailing list.

Also, a new functionality was introduced to Damned Lies in that the service now offers translators the so called reduced PO files; these files do not include strings that are rarely visible to (end) users, such as “gschema.xml.in” strings, making it easier for translation teams with limited manpower to translate the GNOME modules.