(Late) report on 30C3

Oh, I almost missed to report on this year’s CCCongress, 30C3. The thirtieths CCCongress. It has grown considerably over the last few years. We’ve reached over 9000 visitors whereas we had 4000 a couple of years ago. The new venue in Hamburg is amazing. Despite the impressive number of attendees, it didn’t feel crowded at all. So many nice details made the venue just awesome. It really felt like it was *the* place to be. A rather big detail was the installation of a letter shoot. Yes, a real pneumatic postal delivery system. With routing and all. Just amazing.

That’s pretty much all I have to say. It was, of course, nice to meet so many old friends and people. I couldn’t even say hi to all of the ones I wanted to meet. What follows is a bit of a rundown of some of the talks that I’ve actually seen, hoping you can evaluate whether you want to see any of that yourself.

I was a bit late for the conference, probably one of the first talks I’ve seen was DJB on, guess what, crypto. It even has a reference to Poettering (who I was also able to meet :-) )!

Funnily enough, Nate from the EFF mentioned DJB in his talk on disclosure Dos and Donts. He said that it would be smart to think about how much fuzz one wants to make about a vulnerability at hand. Sure enough, the title needs to be catchy enough for people to notice. If you were DJB, then the lecture hall would be filled even if the title was “DJB has something to say”.

Something that stirred up the community was
Assange’s talk. Apparently sabotaged, the Skype connection wasn’t all too good. But it was also not very interesting. The gist: Sysadmin: Go to the three-letter-agencies and carry out document to become the next Snowden. Good advice.

As for carried out documents, Jake Applebaum presented the NSA’s shopping cart which includes all sorts of scary techniques and technologies. If you have only time to watch one video, make it this one. That’s probably even safer than sitting in the audience. Just after he showed the reconnaissance tools for the investigators to combine various data sources, undoubtedly including cell phone location and people around you, he switched on his cell phone so that the audience would have a connection with him. The one who knows he is being spied on. It was a very emotional talk, too.

Another depressing thing was Jöran talking about the missed (digital) opportunities in education. The most noticeable thing he said was that Apple products are consuming devices only. But the reality is that they make it work 93% of the time as opposed to 90%. But that difference makes teachers use it…

More scary, was the presentation on exploration and exploitation SD card controllers. You’re basically screwed. You have close to no idea what it running on the micro controller on your SD card. And on the various other controllers you carry around. They got themselves access to the chip and were able to flash their own firmware. Doesn’t sound all too exciting, but it is an eye opener that your stupid almost invisible SD card can spy on you.

A strange talk was the one on Digital Bank robberies. There are so many weird details they talk about. They claim to have been called for investigation of a malware that found on ATMs in Brazil. The weirdest thing for me was that the physical damage done to the ATMs went unnoticed. The gangsters needed to install a pendrive so they had to break the case. Which apparently isn’t all too secure. And then they had to make the ATM reboot to boot off the pendrive. Without having to press a key. It is unclear to me whether they could leave the pendrive or not. Apparently they could remove it, because if they couldn’t then the malware could have been found much earlier. But given that the ATMs reboot so easily, it would make sense to install the malware on the ATMs hard drive. In that case they could have spotted the malware rather easily. Anyway, the presenting people were not Brazilian. Why would such a sensitive Brazilian investigation be undertaken by foreigners?

Another interesting, although weirdly presented, talk on X Security was given by Ilja van Sprundel. He looked at X code and identified a good number of easily exploitable bugs. No wonder given that the code is 30 years old… He also mentioned libraries on top of X such as GTK+ or Qt and explained how the security story from GNOME was very different from Qt’s. Essentially: The GNOME guys understood security. Qt didn’t.

On the more fun side, the guys from Ztohoven presented their recent work. They are probably best known for their manipulated video which ran during morning TV shows (IIRC).

In their presentation they talked about their performance for which they obtained numbers from parliamentarians and sent them text messages during a session that was aired live. Quite funny, actually. And the technical details are also interesting.

Another artsy piece is “Do You Think That’s Funny?” (program link) in which the speaker describes the troubles their artistic group had to go through during or after their performances. They did things like vote auction (WP), Alanohof, or AnuScan, and their intention is to make surveillance visible and show how it makes activists censor themselves.

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