Bahn Bonus Points Saemmeln

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The Bahn currently has a Web-based game for you to win some of their loyalty points. It’s not a very exciting game, but you get up to 500 points which is half a free ride across the country. (You get the other half when signing up for their program.)

In order to get these 500 points you need to play for an hour or so. Or you observe the Web traffic your browser generates and look closely. You’ll see that the Flash applet fetches a token from the server and sends your result, along with the token and some hash, to the server. How to get the correct hash you ask? Worry not, you will get the correct hash from the server if you don’t send the correct one. You can resend your request with the hash the server sent you and your POST will be accepted. Neat.

I don’t know why they send the “correct_hash”, but it’s obviously a bad idea.

PS: It seems that Kazam has troubles recording my mouse pointer position correctly.

On GNOME and Groupon

You may have noticed that we ran a campaign calling for support regarding the Groupon trademark issue. Fortunately, everything was over much quicker than everybody expected.

It is fair to say that we were surprised by our campaign and the amount of support we had. And so were they (GroupOn). As Bradley said, the campaign could have failed miserably. It was a pure gamble. And I was everything but excited and full of expectations when we launched the campaign. We didn’t know how it would go and our preparation was.. simple, at best. I don’t mean to discredit any of the great work the volunteers around us (and we, ourselves) did. But it’s true that we’re not experts and that we didn’t have all the things in place you could have expected us to have. For example, we didn’t really have a bar of the money raised on the web page. In fact, that information was only available to a limited extent. It’s mainly my fault, but I also blame the fact that we only had mockups of the page, and not real code just until hours before the launch. Personally, my thinking was that we’d have days, if not weeks, to slowly fix things up.

Fortunately, things went differently. The coverage was amazing. I didn’t expect that our very simple page generated so much traffic. It’s hard to come up with an exact timeline of events as everything happened quickly and, in fairness, a bit chaotically. It may have been OMGUbuntu or Reddit who have reported first on our fundraiser. Other sites, such as Phoronix or Hackernews followed quickly. I was told that the latter was exceptional, because it ranked very high for rather long time.

We also had International coverage, i.e. on Heise (with somewhat interesting discussions), Golem (with two more articles!), Computerbase, and others… The usual suspects such as Slashdot, or, of course, LWN had an article as well. Even Arstechnica and Reuters covered our case. And that although we missed sending press releases to most of those sites. Sorry for that :-/

By quickly checking Google News, I know I haven’t found all the articles on the subject, but so far I’ve only found this article which was not in favour of our move. I think this was surprising to most, if not all of us.

Over the course of the day, this image was floating around, showing Brian’s LinkedIn profile which some people found hilarious. Some other pictures were floating around and comments were made. Some of them not in a not acceptable language but most of them were just expressing their concerns regarding Groupon’s behaviour. Some people cancelled all their accounts with Groupon while others started a petition.

We had close to one retweet per second and money was pouring in. The average amount donated was about 20 USD and the rate at which people donated was about 75 USD per minute. Every single minute. This can indeed be considered success. I think I noticed that this is going to be big when Freenode sent a message to all its 80000 connected users asking for supporting our case. “This is bigger than GNOME“, they said. Very correctly so. And it’s a shame, too. Not only for Groupon, because they needed to use the emergency break here, but for the system at large. It shouldn’t be the case that you need money in order to defend yourself against someone misusing your name.

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Dear Internet, thanks. I am overwhelmed. We did not expect that amount of feedback to our recent trademark campaign, let alone the financial contributions. Our campaign was very successful. It was too successful, at least from a technical point of view. We are using a self made, very rudimentary Makefile for the business logic. We are still busy verifying the incoming transactions with Paypal… During the campaign, our servers were very busy handling the incoming requests.

I didn’t expect Groupon to be that cooperative given the behaviour I have observed over the last few months. It might have been Engagdet which were the first to report that Groupon backed up. Other news sites followed suit. All of that happened so quickly, that some news sites couldn’t even report on the case and could only report on Groupon abandoning their marks. That was probably Groupon’s strategy and, I guess, it was a wise choice. They retired their marks, but the app and their page are still online. They also still have a Gnome job posted. But I have no doubt that this will cease to exist.

Again: Thanks to everyone involved. This could as well have been the end to the GNOME Foundation, given that defending the GNOME marks is one of their main reasons for existing. A special thanks to all of you who have spread the word and made this campaign successful. Let’s hope we do not need such a campaign in the future.

For those of you who are interested in some pretty graphs (thanks benzo!), here is another one showing the transaction sizes and their volume. You can see, that we had many many small contributions. This is so amazing. I am very grateful and happy to see our community standing together so closely.

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GNOME at FSCONS14 in Gothenburg, Sweden

I was glad to be invited to FSONCS 2014 in Gothenburg, Sweden. Remember that this is also the place for next year’s GUADEC! This year’s FSCONS was attended by around 150 people or so. I guess it was a bit less. That might not sound like a lot, but it’s a very cool event with many interesting people and talks.

We, GNOME, had a presence at the event due to me bringing the EventsBox and T-Shirts to Gothenburg. It was quite a trip, especially with those heavy boxes…

The first keynote of the conference was given by Karl Fogel. He declared the end of copyright in 1993. He imagined copyright as a tree whose bottom has been chopped off, but the, the top hasn’t noticed that just yet. He put copyright on a timeline and drew a strong relation to the printing press. He claimed that in the United Kingdom, a monopoly used to control who prints and distributes books and it then transferred to a differently shaped monopoly which involved the actual authors. These could then transfer their rights to printers. He went on with ranting about the fact that nowadays you cannot tip the author for their (free) work. He appealed to the authors of f-droid or the firefox mobile app market to integrate such a functionality. Overall it was an interesting talk with many aspects. He is a talented speaker.

The second keynote was given by Leigh Honeywell. She talked about communities and community building. She said that she got most of the ideas presented in her talk from Sumana Harihareswara‘s “Models we use to change the world”. During her talk she referred to her experiences when founded the HackLabTO Hackerspace after having attended the CCCamp 2007. She basically shared models of understanding the community and their behaviour. The Q&A session was inspiring and informative. Many questions about managing a community were asked and answered.

Another interesting talk was given by Guilhem Moulin who went on to talk about Fripost. It is a democratic email service provider from Sweden. He gave a bit of an insight regarding the current Email usage on today’s Internet. He claimed that we have 2.7 billion internet users and that the top three email service providers accumulate roughly a third of this population. His numbers were 425 million for GMail, 420 million for Hotmail, and 280 million for Yahoo. All these companies are part of PRISM, he said, which worried him enough to engage with Fripost. In fact, he became a board member after having been a user and a sysadmin. As someone who operates a mail server for oneself and others with similar needs, I was quite interested in seeing concentrated efforts like this. Fripost’s governance seems to be interesting. It’s a democratic body and I wonder how to thwart malicious subversion. Anyway, the talk was about technical details as to how to create your own fripost.org. So I can only encourage to run your own infrastructure and found structures that care about running ecosystem. A memorable quote he provided to underpin this appeal is attributed to Schneier: “We were safer when our email was at 10,000 ISPs than it was at 10“.

My talk went sufficiently well. I guess I preached to the choir regarding Free Software. I don’t think I needed to convince the people that Free Software is a good thing. As for convincing the audience that GNOME is a good thing, I think I faced a big challenge. Some of the attendees didn’t seem to be very enthusiastic about their desktop which is great. But some others were more in the, what I would call, old school category using lynx, xautoscreenlock, and all that stuff from the 90s. Anyway, we had a great session with many questions from the audience such that I couldn’t even go through my slides.

I had a lightning talk about signing OpenPGP keys using GNOME Keysign. I probably need to write up a separate blog post for that. In short, I mentioned that short key IDs are evil, but that long key IDs are also problematic. Actually, using keyservers is inherently problematic and should be avoided. To do so, I showed how I transfer a key securely and sign it following best practices (thanks to Andrei for an initial version!). Bastian was nice enough to do the demo with me. We needed to cheat a little though, as currently, they key is transferred using the WiFi network you are on. The WiFi, however, didn’t allow us to create a TCP connection to each other. We thus opened a WiFi hotspot and used that. I think this would be a useful feature.

The last talk of the conference was given by Hans Lysglimt from Norway. He is, among other things, a politician, an activist, and an entrepreneur who founded an email service. His runbox has around 1000000 accounts and 30000 paid subscriptions, so it’s fairly big, compared to Fripost at least. Again, running email services myself, I found it interesting to listen to the stories he had to tell. His story was that he received a gag order for running his commercial email service provider. It remained unclear whether it was send because of his interview with Julian Assange or not.

Interestingly, he didn’t seem to have received many correct subpoenas in the sense that they were Norwegian court orders. However, in one case the American authorities went through the Norwegian legal system which he found funny in itself because the two legal system were not very similar. He eventually mentioned that every email service provider has at least one gag order, either an implicit or and explicit one. Ultimately, he concluded that you cannot trust a corporation.

FSCONS is an interesting event. Their manifesto is certainly impressive. I am glad to have visited and I am looking forward to visiting again. It is very atmospheric, very relaxed, and friendly. A very nice place to be.