Bits and pieces from GUADEC 2012.

July 27th, 2012 by aklapper

This city is foggy at 3:30AM.

  • Conference feels well organized and things (wifi, sound, projectors) work.
  • Daniel said that his talk will include pictures of me but I think he fibs. Still not sure whether to consider him a trustworthy source of information after all those years.
  • Happy to see some new faces and that it feels like the highest ratio of women among the attendees ever.
  • The release-team (those 67% that are present) had a meeting to discuss stuff and such.
  • Hotel is a bit outside but has a nice bar so GNOME folks sit outside together till late at night.
  • Andreas Nilsson has found his favorite hairstyle.

GUADEC conference! Next week!

July 19th, 2012 by aklapper

Yet another notorious “I go to GUADEC” post.

My everchanging plans are to provide the Bugsquad annual report at the AGM meeting and to maybe theoretically join Gil Forcada in his talk “Towards less i18n barriers and more (quality) translations” on Saturday morning. Oh wait, morning? Well, we’ll see.

And to split my body on Monday to attend both the Accessibility BoF and the Localization BoF! Somehow! It’s magic!

Other vague plans feature the terms “parties”, “swimming”, “release team meeting”, “football match” and “GUADEC 2013 hosting intentions”.

I hope to see you around!

GNOME.Asia summit over

June 10th, 2012 by aklapper

GNOME.Asia summit ended five hours ago. A big thanks to our friendly and welcoming organizers for their great work and the good time that we had (and still have) here in Hong Kong, and to the companies that sponsored this conference. As sleep is a precious treasure I’m just posting five of the snapshots that I made and leave writing detailed posts to others.

OpeningAllan, Jon and Jakub's talkThunderstorms for free!Liansu's talkClosing

I’d like to thank the GNOME Foundation for their sponsorship! Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

GNOME.Asia summit, Hongkong

June 7th, 2012 by aklapper

Today I arrived in Hong Kong (PRC) to attend this year’s edition of GNOME.Asia summit at the City University of Hong Kong. It takes place on Saturday and Sunday and you can should check out the schedule in case that you are around.

GNOME Asia

On Sunday I am going to explain how to write and improve GNOME user documentation, and maybe join Tobi to present how to triage bug reports.

While asia has so much manpower and emerging economies, GNOME’s development (and its dominant culture) still feels mostly US/Europe centric to me. Ever wondered how many maintainers in GNOME are based in India or China, to pick just two examples? I don’t know many unfortunately. So if attend GNOME.Asia and would like to talk about cultural differences in communities, user documentation, bug management, translation, release management, …, I’d be happy to talk to you!

Also, thank you GNOME Foundation for covering a large part of my expenses! Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

Wikimedia Hackathon, Berlin.

June 2nd, 2012 by aklapper

I’m in sunny and windy Berlin (Germany) again this weekend to attend Wikimedia’s “Hackathon” (Wikimedia is the organization behind Wikipedia and some other projects and websites, in case you didn’t know). I’d like to thank Wikimedia Foundation for the invitation.

Apart from discussing bug management with people I spent most of the day looking at the situation in Wikimedia’s bugtracker a bit – checking the growth rates in the most popular products (where to triage reports more aggressively), gathering some statistical data, trying out funky queries to identify rotting reports (no NEEDINFO state or tag? Sigh, Mozilla Bugzilla makes the same mistake), adapting one of my Greasemonkey scripts to work, looking at existing Wikimedia bug management documentation and identifying missing and redundant information, and in the coffee breaks dreaming of a Natural Language Processing hook when submitting new tickets to analyze the quality of a report on the fly and make the reporter improve it (I know that there’s scientific papers about this topic but I still haven’t seen any implementation so far). Errm, yeah, that was a long sentence.

Publishing and writing text

March 29th, 2012 by aklapper
  • It’s old news and Henri and others already covered it but I would also like to recommend this nice lecture: Lydia Pintscher published Open Device – FOSS: What we wish we had known when we started at this year’s FOSDEM conference! Get the book or the PDF on open-advice.org!
  • Allan, Olav and me wrote the GNOME 3.4 release notes. Hope you like the outcome! I also helped a bit with the Czech translation of them.
  • Three weeks ago I spent an afternoon to update the GNOME Evolution user documentation for the latest version (3.4).
    Afterwards I declared it string frozen so translators know that they will not waste time translating stuff that might change again. Maybe I should evaluate if freezing actually has any positive effort – so far I don’t think it has, however this module is so big that I understand if translators are reluctant to translate it.
  • According to German state law you can get hold of your final Abitur school exam after waiting for ten years.
    As I am always surprised what people on the interwebs consider useful I published it (unfortunately in German language only). It is an analysis of Gustav Mahler‘s “Kindertotenlieder (“Songs on the Death of Children”) which were written by Friedrich Rückert. There are Youtube videos out there if you want to get an impression.

Random recent photos.

March 5th, 2012 by aklapper

GNOME Documentation hackfest team and venue in Brno:

Brno Hackfest

Same folks wondering how to use the “Documents” application:

Brno Hackfest

KDE 4.8 Prague Release Party Cake. Congrats to the KDE team:

KDE 4.8 Release Party

One installation of the “Middle East Europe” exhibition at DOX:

KDE 4.8 Release Party

The Book of Right-On

February 20th, 2012 by aklapper

A quick and dirty blog post to keep the world out there in the loop about what is done by a dozen of people in a big meeting room with a view over Brno, right next to a small meeting room with a view over Brno filled with people that work on a toolkit.

What the docs posse is doing:

What I’ve been doing:

  • As part of Google Code-In, Ivaylo Kalinov Markov proposed a better organized wiki frontpage for the GNOME Translation project.
    I finally merged this with a few tweaks. Thanks for your great work, Ivaylo!
  • Triaged some open documentation bug reports and as usual if you try to fix one thing you end up finding three other issue. Or underlying infrastructure issues.
  • Tried to manually find mismatches between documentation component assignees in GNOME Bugzilla, the GNOME documentation team, and the reality.
  • Other stuff that’s not yet ready for primetime. :)

Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

GNOME Documentation hackfest

February 19th, 2012 by aklapper

The first two days of the GNOME Documentation hackfest in Brno (CZ) are over.
After I picked up a bunch of jetlagged folks at Prague airport to trick them to Brno, we kicked off at the Masaryk University by having brainstorm sessions trying to use the GNOME Documents and GNOME Online Accounts applications (and I realized how bad their design is and wonder if the corresponding developers just cross fingers that somebody will magically pick up the remaining work and bug reports while they might have moved on to write the next new GNOME application).
Today we moved to the Red Hat offices and everybody got assigned an area of the GNOME Desktop help to check for correctness in version 3.4.

Kat and me also updated the GNOME Evolution documentation a bit. Still many things left on my todo list, but we at least got the Bowling session done yesterday night.

Thanks to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring our accommodation and to Red Hat for providing the venue.

Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

Google Code-In 2011: Thanks!

January 17th, 2012 by aklapper

Google Code-In 2011

Today Google Code-In 2011 ended.

Out of the 136 tasks that the GNOME community provided, 124 were successfully resolved by highschool students.

Achievements include

  • code improvements in cheese, gnome-games, vino and other modules,
  • improved or new documentation for Python and C tutorials, Anjuta, Evolution and several GNOME games,
  • updated translation for Czech, Greek, Indonesian, Latvian, Romanian and Ukrainian,
  • (re)testing of applications such as brasero and gnome-boxes,
  • and many more things, especially in outreach and research.

Also see Tiffany’s blogpost about her Code-In mentorship.

Thanks to all mentors, students, helpers and Google! I hope everybody had a good time.
If you participated I am interested in your feedback: What went well, what didn’t? If you didn’t participate, why not? Looking forward to your blog comments or emails.