Entries Tagged 'Red Hat' ↓

On the Road to Fedora Workstation 31

So I hope everyone is enjoying Fedora Workstation 30, but we don’t rest on our laurels here so I thought I share some of things we are working on for Fedora Workstation 31. This is not an exhaustive list, but some of the more major items we are working on.

Wayland – Our primary focus is still on finishing the Wayland transition and we feel we are getting close now, and thank you to the community for their help in testing and verifying Wayland over the last few years. The single biggest goal currently is fully removing our X Windowing System dependency, meaning that GNOME Shell should be able to run without needing XWayland. For those wondering why that has taken so much time, well it is simple; for 20 years developers could safely assume we where running atop of X. So refactoring everything needed to remove any code that makes the assumption that it is running on top of X.org has been a major effort. The work is mostly done now for the shell itself, but there are a few items left in regards to the GNOME Setting daemon where we need to expel the X dependency. Olivier Fourdan is working on removing those settings daemon bits as part of his work to improve the Wayland accessibility support. We are optimistic that can declare this work done within a GNOME release or two. So GNOME 3.34 or maybe 3.36. Once that work is complete an X server (XWayland) would only be started if you actually run a X application and when you shut that application down the X server will be shut down too.

Wayland logo

Wayland Graphics


Another change that Hans de Goede is working on at the moment is allowing X applications to be run as root under XWayland. In general running desktop apps as root isn’t considered adviceable from a security point of view, but since it always worked under X we feel it should continue to be there for XWayland too. This should fix a few applications out there which only works when run as root currently. One last item Hans de Goede is looking at is improving SDLs Wayland support in regards to how it deals with scaling of lower resolution games. Thanks to the great effort by Valve and others we got a huge catalog of games available under Linux now and we want to ensure that those keep running and runs well. So we will work with the SDL devs to come up with a solution here, we just don’t know the exact shape and and form the solution will take yet, so stay tuned.

Finally there is the NVidia binary driver support question. So you can run a native Wayland session on top of the binary driver and you had that ability for a very long time. Unfortunately there has been no support for the binary driver in XWayland and thus and X applications (which there are a lot of) would not be getting any HW accelerated 3D graphics support. Adam Jackson has worked on letting XWaylands load the binary NVidia x.org driver and we are now waiting on NVidia to review that work and hopefully be able to update their driver to support it.

Once we are done with this we expect X.org to go into hard maintenance mode fairly quickly. The reality is that X.org is basically maintained by us and thus once we stop paying attention to it there is unlikely to be any major new releases coming out and there might even be some bitrot setting in over time. We will keep an eye on it as we will want to ensure X.org stays supportable until the end of the RHEL8 lifecycle at a minimum, but let this be a friendly notice for everyone who rely the work we do maintaining the Linux graphics stack, get onto Wayland, that is where the future is.

PipeWire – Wim Taymans keeps improving the core features of Pipewire, as we work step by step to be ready to replace Jack and PulseAudio. He has recently been focusing on improving existing features like the desktop sharing portal together with Jonas Adahl and we are planning a hackfest for Wayland in the fall, current plan is to do it around the All Systems Go conference in Berlin, but due to some scheduling conflicts by some of our core stakeholders we might need to reschedule it to a little later in fall.
A new user for the desktop sharing portal is the new Miracast support that Benjamin Berg has been steadily working on. The Miracast support is shaping up and you can grab the Network Displays test client from his COPR repository while he is working to get the package into Fedora proper. We would appreciate further users testing and feedback as we know there are definitely devices out there where things do not work properly and identifying them is the first step to figuring out how to make our support in the desktop more robust. Eventually we want to make the GNOME integration even more seamless than the standalone app, but for early testing and polish it does the trick. If you are interested in contributing the code is hosted here on github.

Network Display

Network Display application using Miracast

Btw, you still need to set the enable Pipewire flag in Chrome to get the Pipewire support (chrome://flags). So I included a screenshot here to show you where to go in the browser and what the key is called:

Chrome Pipewire Flag

Chrome Pipewire Flag

Flatpak – Work on Flatpak in Fedora is continuing. Current focus is on improving the infrastructure for building Flatpaks from RPMS and automating what we can.This is pre-requisite work for eventually starting to ship some applications as Flatpaks by default and eventually shipping all applications as Flatpaks by default. We are also working on setting things up so that we can offer applications from flathub.io and quay.io out of the box and in accordance with Fedora rules for 3rd party software. We are also making progress on making a Red Hat UBI based runtime available. This means that as a 3rd party developer you can use that to build your applications on top of and be certain that it will be stay around and be supported by Red Hat for the lifetime of a given RHEL release, which means around 10 years. This frees you up as a developer to really update your application at your own pace as opposed to have to chase more short lived runtimes. It will also ensure that your application can be certified for RHEL which gives you access to all our workstation customers in addition to Fedora and all other distros.

Fedora Toolbox – Work is progressing on the Fedora Toolbox, our tool for making working with pet containers feel simple and straightforward. Debarshi Ray is currently looking on improvements to GNOME Terminal that will ensure that you get a more natural behaviour inside the terminal when interacting with pet containers, for instance ensuring that if you have a terminal open to a pet container and create a new tab that tab will also be inside the container inside of pointing at the host. We are also working on finding good ways to make the selection of containers more discoverable, so that you more easily can get access to a Red Hat UBI container or a Red Hat TensorFlow container for instance. There will probably be a bit of a slowdown in terms of new toolbox features soon though as we are going to rewrite it to make it more maintainable. The current implementation is a giant shell script, but the new version will most likely be written in Go (so that we can more easily integrate with the other container libraries and tools out there, mostly written in Go).

Fedora Toolbox

Fedora Toolbox in action

GNOME Classic – We have had Classic mode available in GNOME and Fedora for a long time, but we recently decided to give it a second look and try to improve the experience. So Allan Day reviewed the experience and we decided to make it a more pure GNOME 2 style experience by dropping the overview completely when you run classic mode.
We have also invested time and effort on improving the Classic mode workspace switcher to make life better for people who use a very workspace centric workflow. The goal of the improvements is to make the Classic mode workspace switcher more feature complete and also ensure that it can work with standard GNOME 3 in addition to Classic mode. We know this will greatly improve the experience for many of our users and at the same time hopefully let new people switch to Fedora and GNOME to get the advantage of all the other great improvements we are bringing to Linux and the Linux desktop.

Sysprof & performance – We have had a lot of focus in the community on improving GNOME Shell performance. Our particular focus has been on doing both some major re-architecting of some core subsystems that where needed to make some of the performance improvements you seen even possible. And lately Christian Hergert has been working on improving our tooling for profiling the desktop, so let our developers more easily see exactly where in the stack bottlenecks are and what is causing them. Be sure to read Christians blog for further details about sysprof and friends.

Fleet Commander – our tool for configuring large deployments of Fedora and RHEL desktops should have a release out very soon that can work with Active Directory as your LDAP server. We know a lot of RHEL and Fedora desktop users are part of bigger organizations where Linux users are a minority and thus Active Directory is being deployed in the organization. With this new release Fleet Commander can be run using Active Directory or FreeIPA as the directory server and thus a lot of organizations who previously could not easily deploy Fleet Commander can now take advantage of this powerful tool. Next step for Fleet Commander after that is finishing of some lose ends in terms of our Firefox support and also ensure that you can easily configure GNOME Shell extensions with Fleet Commander. We know a lot of our customers and users are deploying one or more GNOME Shell extensions for their desktop so we want to ensure Fleet Commander can help you do that efficiently across your whole fleet of systems.

Fingerprint support – We been working closely with our hardware partners to bring proper fingerprint reader support to Linux. Bastien Nocera worked on cleaning up the documentation of fprint and make sure there is good sample code and our hardware partners then worked with their suppliers to ensure they provided drivers conforming to the spec for hardware supplied to them. So there is a new drivers from Synaptics finger print readers coming out soon thanks to this effort. We are not stopping there though, Benjamin Berg is continuing the effort to improve the infrastructure for Linux fingerprint reader support, making sure we can support in-device storage of fingerprints for instance.

Fingerprint image

Fingerprint readers now better supported

Gamemode – Christian Kellner has been contributing a bit to gamemode recently, working to make it more secure and also ensure that it can work well with games packaged as Flatpaks. So if you play Linux games, especially those from Ferral Interactive, and want to squeeze some extra performance from your system make sure to install gamemode on your Fedora system.

Dell Totem support – Red Hat has a lot of customers in the fields of animation and CAD/CAM systems. Due to this Benjamin Tissoires and Peter Hutterer been working with Dell on enabling their Totem input device for a while now. That works is now coming to a close with the Totem support shipping in the latest libinput version with the kernel side of things being merged some time ago. You can get the full details from Peters blog about Dell Totem.

Dell Totel

The Dell Totem input device

Media codec support – So the OpenH264 2.0 release is out from Cisco now and Kalev Lember has been working to get the Fedora packages updated. This is a crucial release as it includes the support for Main and High profile that I mentioned in an earlier blog post. That work happened due to a collaboration between Cisco, Endless, Red Hat and Centricular with Jan Schmidt at Centricular doing the work implementing support for these two codecs. This work makes OpenH264 a lot more useful as it now supports playing back most files found in the wild and we been working to ensure it can be used for general playback in Firefox. At the same time Wim Taymans is working to fix some audio quality issues in the AAC implementation we ship so we should soon have both a fully working H264 decoder/encoder in Fedora and a fully functional AAC decoder/encoder. We are still trying to figure out what to do with MPEG2 video as we are ready to ship support for that too, but are still trying to figure out the details of implementation. Beyond that we don’t have any further plans around codecs atm as we feel that with H264, MPEG2 video, AAC, mp3 and AC3 we have them most critical ones covered, alongside the growing family of great free codecs such as VP9, Opus and AV1. We might take a look at the status of things like Windows Media and DivX at some point, but it is not anywhere close to the top of our priority list currently.

Preparing for Fedora Workstation 30

I just installed the Fedora Workstation 30 Beta yesterday and so far things are looking great. As many others have reported to, with the GNOME 3.32 update things definitely feels faster and smoother. So I thought it was a good time to talk about what is coming in Fedora Workstation 30 and what we are currently working on.

Fractional Scaling: One of the big features that landed, although still considered experimental was the fractional scaling feature that has been a collaboration between Jonas Ådahl here at Red hat and Marco Trevisan at Canonical. It has taken quite some time since the initial hackfest as it is a complex task, but we are getting close. Fractional scaling is a critical feature for many HiDPI screen laptops to get a desktop size that perfectly fits their screen, not being to small or to large.

Screen sharing support for Chrome and Firefox under Wayland. The Wayland security model doesn’t allow any application to freely grab images or streams of the whole desktop like you could under X. This is of course a huge improvement in security, but it did cause some disruption for valid usecases like screen sharing with things like BlueJeans and Google Hangouts. We been working on resolving that with the help of PipeWire. We been at it for some time and things are now coming together. Chrome 73 ships with everything needed to make this work with Chrome, although you have to turn it on manually (got to this URL to turn it on: chrome://flags/#enable-webrtc-pipewire-capturer). The reason it needs to be manually enabled is not that it is unreliable, it is because the UI is still a little fugly due to a combination of feature overlap between the browser and the desktop and also how the security feature of the desktop is done. We are trying to come up with ways for the UI to be smoother without sacrificing your privacy/security. For Firefox we will keep shipping with our downstream patch until we manage to get it landed upstream.

Firefox for Wayland: Martin Stransky has been hard at work making Firefox be able to run Wayland-native. That work is tantalizingly near, but we decided to postpone it for Fedora Workstation 31 in the end to make sure it is really well polished before releasing it upon the world. The advantage of Wayland native Firefox is that in addition to bring us one step closer to not needing to run an X server (XWayland) all the time it also enables things like fractional scaling mentioned above to work for Firefox.

OpenH264 improved: As many of you know Firefox relies on a library called OpenH264, provided by Cisco, for its H264 video codec support for WebRTC. This library is also provided to Fedora users from Cisco free of charge (you can install it through GNOME Software). However its usefulness have been somewhat limited due to only supporting the baseline profile used for video calling, but not the Main and High profiles used by most online video content. Well what I can tell you is that Red Hat, Endless and Cisco partnered with Centricular some time ago to add support for decoding those profiles to OpenH264 and that work is now almost complete. The basic code enabling them is already merged, but Jan Schmidt at Centricular is working on fixing a few files that are still giving us problems. As soon as that is generally shipping we hope to get Firefox to be able to use OpenH264 also for things like Youtube playback and of course also use OpenH264 to playback any H264 using GStreamer applications like Totem. So a big thank you to Endless, Cisco and Centricular for working with us on this and thus enabling us to have a legal way to offer H264 support to our users.

NVidia binary driver support under Wayland: We been putting it quite a bit of effort trying to tie off the lose ends for using the NVidia binary driver with Wayland. We did manage to fix a long list of bugs like dealing with various colorspace issues, multimonitor setups and so on. For Intel and AMD graphics users things should actually be pretty good to go at this point. The last major item holding us back on the NVidia side is full support for using the binary driver with XWayland applications (native Wayland applications should work fine already). Adam Jackson worked diligently to get all the pieces in place and we do think we have a model now that will allow NVidia to provide an updated driver that should enable XWayland. As it stands though that driver update is likely to only come out towards the fall, so we will keep defaulting to X for NVidia binary driver users for some time more.

Gaming under Wayland. Olivier Fourdan and Jonas Ådahl has trying to crush any major Wayland bug reported for quite some time now and one area where we seem to have rounded the corner is for games. Valve has been kind enough to give us the ability to install and run any steam game for testing purposes, so whenever we found a game giving us trouble we have been able to let Olivier and Jonas reproduce it easily. So on my own gaming box I am now able to run all the Steam games I have under Wayland, including those using Proton, without a hitch. We haven’t tested with the full Steam catalog of course, there are thousands, so if your favourite game is giving you trouble under Wayland still, please let us know. Talking about gaming one area we will try to free up some cycles going forward to look deeper at is Flatpaks and gaming. We already done quite a bit of work in this area, with things like the NVidia binary driver extension and the Steam package on Flathub. But we know from leading linux game devs that there are still some challenges to be resolved, like making host device access for gamepads simpler from within the Flatpak sandbox.

Flatpak Creation in Fedora. Owen Taylor has been in charge of getting Flatpaks building in Fedora, ensuring we can produce Flatpaks from Fedora packages. Owen set up a system to track the Fedora Flatpak status, we got about 10 applications so far, but hope to greatly grow that number of time as we polish up the system. This enables us to start planning for shipping some applications in Fedora Workstation as Flatpaks by default in a future release. This respository will be available by default in Fedora workstation 30 and you can choose the flatpak version of the package through the new drop down box in the top right corner of GNOME Software. For now the RPM version of the package is still the default, but we expect to change that in later releases of Fedora Workstation.

Gedit in GNOME Software with Source drop down box

Gedit in GNOME Software with Source drop down box

Fedora Toolbox – Debarshi Ray is leading the effort we call Fedora Toolbox, which is our starting point for our goal to revitalise and revolutionize development on Linux. Fedora Toolbox is trying to take the model of a pet container for development and make it seamless and natural. Our goal is to make it dead simple to create pet containers for your projects, so you can for instance have a Fedora pet container where you develop against the leading edge libraries and tools in Fedora, and you can have a RHEL based container where you develop against the library versions and tools shipping in RHEL (makes updating and fixing in production applications a lot easier) and maybe a SteamOS container to work on your little game project. Currently the model is that you have one pet container per OS your targeting, but we are pondering if maybe having one pet container per project would be even better if we can find good ways to avoid it being a lot of extra overhead (by for example having to re-install all your favourite command line tools in the container) or just outright confusing (which container got what tools and libraries again). Our goal here though is to ensure Fedora becomes the premier container native OS out there and thus a natural home for developers doing container development.
We are also working with the team inside Red Hat focusing on AI/ML and trying to ensure that we have a super smooth way for you to get a pet container with things like TensorFlow and CUDA up and running quickly.

Being an excellent platform for Openshift and Kubernetes development: We are putting effort into together with the Red Hat developer tools organization to bringing the OpenShift and CodeReady Studio and CodeReady Workspaces tools to Fedora. These tools have so far been very focused on RHEL support, but thanks to Flatpak for CodeReady Studio and web integration for CodeReady Workspaces we now have a path for making them easily available in Fedora too. In the world of Kubernetes OpenShift is where you want to be, and we want Fedora Workstation to be the ultimate portal for OpenShift development.

Fleet Commander with Active Directory support – So we are about to hit a very major milestone with Fleet Commander our large scale desktop management tool for Fedora and RHEL. Oliver Gutierrez has been hard at work making it work with Active Directory in addition to the existing FreeIPA support. We know that a majority of people interested in Fleet Commander are only using Active Directory currently, so being able to use Active Directory with Fleet Commander should make this great tool available to a huge number of new users. So if you are managing a University computer lab or a large number of Fedora or RHEL clients in your company we should soon have a Fleet Commander release out that you can use. And if you are not using Fedora or RHEL today well Fleet Commander is a very big reason for switching over!
We will do a proper announcement with further details once the release with Active Directory support is out.

PipeWire – I don’t have a major development to report, just a lot of steady work being done to stabilize and improve PipeWire. As mentioned earlier we now have Wayland screen sharing and recording working smoothly in the major browsers which is the user facing feature I think most of you will notice. Wim is still working on pushing the audio side it forward, but that is also a huge task. We have started talking about organizing a new hackfest soon to see if we can accelerate the effort further again. Likely scenario at this point in time is that we start enabling the JACK side of PipeWire first, maybe as early as Fedora Workstation 31, and then come back and do the PulseAudio replacement as a last stage.

Improved Input handling Another area we keep focusing on is improving input in Fedora. Peter Hutterer and Benjamin Tissoires are working hard on improving the stack. Peter just sent an extensive RFC out for how to deal with high resolution mice under Linux and Benjamin has been trying to get support for the Dell Totem landed. Neither will be there unfortunately for Fedora Workstation 30,but we expect to land this before Fedora Workstation 31.

Flicker-free boot
Hans de Goede has continued working on his effort to create a flicker-free boot experience with Fedora. The results of this work is on display in Fedora Workstation 30 and will for most of you now provide a seamless bootup experience . This effort is not so much about functionality as it is about ensuring you have an end-to-end polished experience with your Linux desktop. Things like the constant mode changes we seen in the past contribute to giving Linux an image of being unpolished and we want Fedora to be the vehicle that breaks down that image.

Ramping up Silverblue

For those of you following Fedora you are probably aware of Silverblue, which is our effort to re-think the Linux desktop distribution from the ground up and help us take the Linux desktop to a new level. The distribution model hasn’t really changed much over the last 20 years and we probably polished up the offering as far as we can within the scope of that model. For instance I upgraded my system to Fedora 30 beta yesterday and it was a long and tedious process of looking at about 6000 individual packages get updated from the Fedora 29 version to the Fedora 30 version one by one. I didn’t hit a lot of major snags despite this being a beta, but it is screamingly obvious that updating your operating system in this way is both slow and inherently fragile as anyone of those 6000 packages might hit a problem during upgrade and leave the system in a unknown state, especially since its common for packages to run scripts and similar as part of their upgrade.

Silverblue provides a revolutionary replacement for that process. First of all since it ships as a unified image we make life a lot easier for our QE team who can then test and verify against a single image which is in a known state. This in turn ensures that you as a user can feel confident that the new OS version will not break something on your system. And since the new version is just an image stored on your system next to the old one, upgrading is just about rebooting your system. There is no waiting for individual packages to get upgraded, as everything is already there and ready. Compare it to booting into a different kernel version on Fedora, it is quick and trivial.
And this also means that in the unlikely case that there is a problem with the new OS version you can just as easily go back to the previous version, by rebooting again and choosing to boot into that version. So you basically have instant upgrades with instant rollback if needed.
We believe this will radically change the way you look at OS upgrades forever, in fact you might almost forget they are happening.

And since Silverblue will basically be a Flatpak (and other containers) only OS you will have a clean delimitation between OS and applications. This means that even if we do major updates to the host, your applications should remain unaffected by the host OS update.
In fact we have some very interesting developments underway for Flatpak, with some major new efforts underway, efforts that I would love to talk about, but they are tied to some major Red Hat announcements that will happen at this years Red Hat Summit which will happen on May 7th – May 9th, so I will leave it as a teaser and then let you all know once the Summit is underway and Red Hats related major announcements are done.

There is a lot of work happening around Silverblue and as it happens Matthias Clasen wrote a long blog entry about it today. That blog goes into a lot more details on some of the Silverblue work items we been doing.

Anyway, I feel really excited about Silverblue and as we continue to refine the experience and figure out how everything will look in this brave new world I am sure everyone else will get excited too. Silverblue represents the single biggest evolution of the Linux desktop since the original GNOME and KDE releases back in the late nineties. It is not just about trying to tweak the existing experience, but an attempt at taking a big leap forward and provide an operating system that embodies all that we learned over these last 20 years and provide a natural home for developers and creators of all kind in our container centric computing future. Be sure to grab the Silverblue image of Fedora 30 beta and give it a test run. I recommend activating flathub.org repo to get started in order to get a decent range of applications available. As we move forward we are working hard to ensure that you have the world of applications available out of the box, so no need to go an enable any 3rd party repositories, but there are some more work that needs to happen before we can do that.

Summary
So Fedora Workstation 30 is going to be another exiting release of both of traditional RPM based Workstation version and of Silverblue, and I hope they will encourage even more people to join our rapidly growing Fedora community. Be sure to join us in #fedora-workstation on freenode IRC to talk!

LVFS adopted by Linux Foundation

Today the announcement went out that the Linux Vendor Firmware Service has become and official Linux Foundation service. For those that don’t know it yet LVFS is a service that provides firmware for your linux running hardware and it was one off our initial efforts as part of the Fedora Workstation effort to drain the swamp in terms of making Linux a first class desktop operating system.

The effort came about due to Peter Jones, who is Red Hats representative to the UEFI standards body, approaching me to talk about how Microsoft was trying to push for a standardized way to ship UEFI firmware for Windows and how UEFI being a standard openeded a path for us to actually get full support for this without each vendor having to ship and maintain their own proprietary firmware tools. So we did a meeting with Peter Jones and also brought in Richard Hughes who had already been looking at the problem of firmware updates in Linux, partly due to his ColorHug hardware, and the effort got started with Peter working on the low level OS tooling and Richard taking on building the service to drive distribution and the work to integrate it all into GNOME Software. One concern we had of course was if we could reach critical mass for this and get vendors interested, but luckily Dell was just as keen on improving firmware handling under Linux as us and signed on from the start. Having Dell onboard helped give the effort a lot of credibility and as the service matured we ended up having more and more vendors sign up. We also reached out through Red Hats partnerships to push vendors to adopt supporting it. As Richard also mentions in his interview about it, we had made the solution as similar to Microsofts as possible to decrease the threshold for hardware vendors to join, the goal being that if they did the basic work to support Windows they could more or less just ship the same firmware file to LVFS.

One issue that we had gone back on forth about inside Red Hat was the formal setup of the service. While we all agreed the service was hugely beneficial it felt like something that should be a shared service for all of Linux and we felt that if the service was Red Hat provided it might dissuade other vendors to join. So we started looking around for a neutral place to land the service while in the meantime LVFS had a sort of autonomous status being run as a community effort by Richard Hughes. We ended up talking to Chris Wright, the Red Hat CTO, about the project and he offered to facilitate contact with the Linux Foundation. The initial meetings was very positive and the Linux Foundation seemed interested in running the service right from the start, it did end up taking us quite some time to clear all formal and technical hurdles to get there, but I for one is very happy to see the LVFS now being a vendor neutral service provided by the Linux Foundation.

So a big thank you to Richard Hughes, Peter Jones, Chris Wright, Mario Limonciello and Dell and the Linux Foundation for their help in getting us here. And also a big thank you to Fedora and the Fedora community for their help with providing us a place to develop and polish up this service to the benefit of all. To me this is one of many examples of how Fedora keeps innovating and leading the way on Desktop linux.

PipeWire Hackfest

So we kicked off the PipeWire hackfest in Edinburgh yesterday. We have 15 people attending including Arun Raghavan, Tanu Kaskinen and Colin Guthrie from PulseAudio, PipeWire creator Wim Taymans, Bastien Nocera and Jan Grulich representing GNOME and KDE, Mark Brown from the ALSA kernel team, Olivier Crête,George Kiagiadakis and Nicolas Dufresne was there to represent embedded usecases for PipeWire and finally Thierry Bultel representing automotive.

The event kicked off with Wim Taymans presenting on current state of PipeWire and outlining the remaining issues and current thoughts on how to resolve them. Most of the first day was spent on a roadtable discussion about what are and should be the goals of PipeWire and what potential tradeoffs there would be going forward. PipeWire is probably a bit closer to Jack than PulseAudio in design, so quite a bit of the discussion went on how that would affect the PulseAudio usecases and what is planned to ensure PipeWire works very well for consumer audio usecases.

Personally I ended up spending quite some time just testing and running various Jack apps to see what works already and what doesn’t. In terms of handling outputing audio with Jack apps I was positively surprised how many Jack apps I was able to make work (aka output audio) using PipeWire instead of Jack, but of course we still have some gaps to cover before PipeWire is ready as a drop-in Jack replacement, for instance the Jack session management protocol needs to be implemented first.

The second day we outlined the areas that need work before we are ready to replace PulseAudio and came up with the following list:

  • Mixers – This is basically dealing with hardware mixers. Arun and Wim started looking at a design for this during the hackfest.
  • PulseAudio services – This is all the things in PulseAudio that is not very suitable for putting inside PipeWire. The idea is instead to put them in a separate daemon. This includes things like network streaming, ROAP, DBus apis and so on.
  • Policy/Session handling – We plan to move policy and session handling out of PulseAudio to make it easier for different usecases to set their own policies. PipeWire will still provide some default setup, but the idea here is to have a separate daemon(s) to provide this. Bastien Nocera started prototyping a setup where he could create policy and session handling using Lua scripting.
  • Filters
  • Bluetooth – Ensuring we have great bluetooth support with PipeWire. We would want to move Bluetooth handling to its own daemon, and not have it inside like in PulseAudio to allow for more flexibility with various embedded bluetooth stacks for instance. This could also mean looking at the Linux Bluetooth stack more widely as things are not ideal atm, especially from a security viewpoint.
  • Device reservation – We expect to replace Jack and PulseAudio in steps, starting with PulseAudio. So dealing well with hardware reservation is important to allow people to for instance keep running Jack alongside PipeWire until we are ready for full replacement.
  • Stream Monitoring – Important feature from Jack and PulseAudio that still needs implementing to allowing monitoring audio devices and streams.
  • Latency handling – Improving ways we can deal with hardware latency in for instance consumer devices such as TVs

It is still a bit hard to have a clear timeline for when we will be ready to drop in PipeWire support to replace PulseAudio and then Jack, but we feel the Wayland migration was a good example to follow where we held off doing the switch until we felt comfortable the move would be transparent to most users. There will of course always be corner cases and bugs, but we hope that in general people agree that the Wayland transition was done in a responsible manner and thus could be a good example to follow for us here.

We would like to offers big thanks to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring travel for some of the community attendees and to Collabora for sponsoring dinner for all attendees the first night.

If you want to take a look at PipeWire, Wim updated the wiki page with PipeWire build intructions to be up-to-date. The hackfest attendees tested them out so we are sure they work, just be aware that you want the ‘Work’ branch and not the Master branch, as that is the one where all the audio work is happening. The Master branch is the video focused branch we use in Fedora for desktop remoting support in browsers and VNC under Wayland.

Fedora Toolbox ready for testing!

As many of you know we kicked of a ambitious goal to revamp the Linux desktop when we launched Fedora Workstation 4 years. We wanted to remove many of the barriers to adoption of Linux as a desktop and make it a better operating system for all, especially for developers.
To that effect we have been pushing a long range of initiatives over the last 4 years ago, ranging from providing a better input stack through libinput, a better display system through Wayland, a better audio and video subsystem through PipeWire, a better way of doing application packaging and dependency handling through Flatpak, a better application installation history through GNOME Software, actual firmware handling for Linux through Linux Vendor Firmware Service, better manageability through Fleet Commander, and Project Silverblue for reliable OS updates. We also had a lot of efforts done to improve general hardware handling, be that work on glvnd and friends for dealing with NVidia driver, the Bolt project for handling Thunderbolt devices better, HiDPI support in the desktop, better touch support in the desktop, improved laptop battery life, and ongoing work to improve state of fingerprint readers under Linux and to provide a flicker free boot experience.

One thing though that was clear to us was that as we where making all these changes to improve the ease of use and reliability of Linux as a desktop operating system we couldn’t make life worse for developers. Developers are the lifeblood of Fedora and Linux and thus we have had Debarshi Ray working on a project we call Fedora Toolbox. Fedora toolbox creates a seamless experience for developers when using an immutable OS like Silverblue, yet want to be able to install the wonderful world of software libraries and tools that makes Linux so powerful for developers. Fedora Toolbox is now ready for early adopters to start testing, so I recommend jumping over to Debarshi’s blog to read up on Fedora Toolbox.

GStreamer Conference 2018

For the 9th time this year there will be the GStreamer Conference. This year it will be in Edinburgh, UK right after the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, on the 25th of 26th of October. The GStreamer Conference is always a lot of fun with a wide variety of talks around Linux and multimedia, not all of them tied to GStreamer itself, for instance in the past we had a lot of talks about PulseAudio, V4L, OpenGL and Vulkan and new codecs.This year I am really looking forward to talks such as the DeepStream talk by NVidia, Bringing Deep Neural Networks to GStreamer by Pexip and D3Dx Video Game Streaming on Windows by Bebo, to mention a few.

For a variety of reasons I missed the last couple of conferences, but this year I will be back in attendance and I am really looking forward to it. In fact it will be the first GStreamer Conference I am attending that I am not the organizer for, so it will be nice to really be able to just enjoy the conference and the hallway track this time.

So if you haven’t booked yourself in already I strongly recommend going to the GStreamer Conference website and getting yourself signed up to attend.

See you all in Edinburgh!

Also looking forward to seeing everyone attending the PipeWire Hackfest happening right after the GStreamer Conference.

Supporting developers on Patreon (and similar)

For some time now I been supporting two Linux developers on patreon. Namely Ryan Gordon of Linux game porting and SDL development fame and Tanu Kaskinen who is a lead developer on PulseAudio these days.

One of the things I often think about is how we can enable more people to make a living from working on the Linux desktop and related technologies. If your reading my blog there is a good chance that you are enabling people to make a living on working on the Linux desktop by paying for RHEL Workstation subscriptions through your work. So a big thank you for that. The fact that Red Hat has paying customers for our desktop products is critical in terms of our ability to do so much of the maintenance and development work we do around the Linux Desktop and Linux graphics stack.

That said I do feel we need more venues than just employment by companies such as Red Hat and this is where I would love to see more people supporting their favourite projects and developers through for instance Patreon. Because unlike one of funding campaigns repeat crowdfunding like Patreon can give developers predictable income, which means they don’t have to worry about how to pay their rent or how to feed their kids.

So in terms of the two Patreons I support Ryan is probably the closest to being able to rely on it for his livelihood, but of course more Patreon supporters will enable Ryan to be even less reliant on payments from game makers. And Tanu’s patreon income at the moment is helping him to spend quite a bit of time on PulseAudio, but it is definitely not providing him with a living income. So if you are reading this I strongly recommend that you support Ryan Gordon and Tanu Kaskinen on Patreon. You don’t need to pledge a lot, I think in general it is in fact better to have many people pledging 10 dollars a Month than a few pledging hundreds, because the impact of one person coming or going is thus a lot less. And of course this is not just limited to Ryan and Tanu, search around and see if any projects or developers you personally care deeply about are using crowdfunding and support them, because if more of us did so then more people would be able to make a living of developing our favourite open source software.

Update: Seems I wasn’t the only one thinking about this, Flatpak announced today that application devs can put their crowdfunding information into their flatpaks and it will be advertised in GNOME Software.

3rd Party Software in Fedora Workstation

So you have probably noticed by now that we started offering some 3rd party software in the latest Fedora Workstation namely Google Chrome, Steam, NVidia driver and PyCharm. This has come about due to a long discussion in the Fedora community on how we position Fedora Workstation and how we can improve our user experience. The principles we base of this policy you can read up on in this policy document. To sum it up though the idea is that while the Fedora operating system you install will continue as it has been for the last decade to be based on only free software (with an exception for firmware) you will be able to more easily find and install the plethora of applications out there through our software store application, GNOME Software. We also expect that as the world of Linux software moves towards containers in general and Flatpaks specifically we will have an increasing number of these 3rd party applications available in Fedora.

So the question I know some of you will have is, what do one actually have to do in order to get a 3rd party application listed in Fedora Workstation? Well wonder no longer as we put up a few documents now outlining the steps you will need to take. Compared to traditional linux packaging the major difference in the requirements around improved metadata for your application, so we are covering that aspect in special detail. These documents cover both RPMS and Flatpaks.

First of all you can get a general overview from our 3rd Party guidelines document. This document also explains how you submit a request to the Fedora Workstation Working group for your application to be added.

Then if you want to dig into the details of what metadata you need to create for your application there is the in-depth metadata tutorial here and finally once you are ready to set up your repository there is a tutorial explaining how you ensure your repository is able to provide the metadata you created above.

We expect to add more and more applications to Fedora Workstation over time here, and I would especially recommend that you look into Flatpaking your 3rd party application as it will decouple your application from the host operating system and thus decrease the workload on you maintaining your application for use in Fedora Workstation (and elsewhere).

Adding support for the Dell Canvas and Totem

I am very happy to see that Benjamin Tissoires work to enable the Dell Canvas and Totem has started to land in the upstream kernel. This work is the result of a collaboration between ourselves at Red Hat and Dell to bring this exciting device to Linux users.

Dell Canvas 27

Dell Canvas

The Dell Canvas and totem is essentially a graphics tablet with a stylus and also a turnable knob that can be placed onto the graphics tablet. Dell feature some videos on their site showcasing the Dell Canvas being used in ares such as drawing, video editing and CAD.

So for Linux applications supporting graphic drawing tablets already the canvas should work once this lands, but where we hope to see applications developers step up is adding support in their application for the totem. I have been pondering how we could help make that happen as we would be happy to donate a Dell Canvas to help kickstart application support, I am just unsure about the best way to go ahead.
I was considering offering one as a prize for the first application to add support for the totem, but that seems to be a chicken and egg problem by definition. If anyone got any suggestions for how to get one of these into the hands of the developer most interested and able to take advantage of it?

Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28

Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.

Thunderbolt
Christian Kellner has done a tremendous job keeping everyone informed of his work making sure we have proper Thunderbolt support in Fedora Workstation 28. One important aspect for us of this improved Thunderbolt support is that a lot of docking stations coming out will be requiring it and thus without this work being done you would not be able to use a wide range of docking stations. For a lot of screenshots and more details about how the thunderbolt support is done I recommend reading this article in Christians Blog.

3rd party applications
It has taken us quite some time to get there as getting this feature right both included a lot of internal discussion about policies around it and implementation detail. But starting from Fedora Workstation 28 you will be able to find more 3rd party software listed in GNOME Software if you enable it. The way it will work is that you as part of the initial setup will be asked if you want to have 3rd party software show up in GNOME Software. If you are upgrading you will be asked inside GNOME Software if you want to enable 3rd party software. You can also disable 3rd party software after enabling it from the GNOME Software settings as seen below:

GNOME Software settings

GNOME Software settings

In Fedora Workstation 27 we did have PyCharm available, but we have now added the NVidia driver and Steam to the list for Fedora Workstation 28.

We have also been working with Google to try to get Chrome included here and we are almost there as they merged for instance the needed Appstream metadata some time ago, but the last steps requires some tweaking of how Google generates their package repository (basically adding the appstream metadata to their yum repository) and we don’t have a clear timeline for when that will happen, but as soon as it does the Chrome will also appear in GNOME Software if you have 3rd party software enabled.

As we speak all 3rd party packages are RPMs, but we expect that going forward we will be adding applications packaged as Flatpaks too.

Finally if you want to propose 3rd party applications for inclusion you can find some instructions for how to do it here.

Virtualbox guest
Another major feature that got some attention that we worked on for this release was Hans de Goedes work to ensure Fedora Workstation could run as a virtualbox guest out of the box. We know there are many people who have their first experience with linux running it under Virtualbox on Windows or MacOSX and we wanted to make their first experience as good as possible. Hans worked with the virtualbox team to clean up their kernel drivers and agree on a stable ABI so that they could be merged into the kernel and maintained there from now on.

Firmware updates
The Spectre/Meltdown situation did hammer home to a lot of people the need to have firmware updates easily available and easy to update. We created the Linux Vendor Firmware service for Fedora Workstation users with that in mind and it was great to see the service paying off for many Linux users, not only on Fedora, but also on other distributions who started using the service we provided. I would like to call out to Dell who was a critical partner for the Linux Vendor Firmware effort from day 1 and thus their users got the most benefit from it when Spectre and Meltdown hit. Spectre and Meltdown also helped get a lot of other vendors off the fence or to accelerate their efforts to support LVFS and Richard Hughes and Peter Jones have been working closely with a lot of new vendors during this cycle to get support for their hardware and devices into LVFS. In fact Peter even flew down to the offices one of the biggest laptop vendors recently to help them resolve the last issues before their hardware will start showing up in the firmware service. Thanks to the work of Richard Hughes and Peter Jones you will both see a wider range of brands supported in the Linux Vendor Firmware Service in Fedora Workstation 28, but also a wider range of device classes.

Server side GL Vendor Neutral Dispatch
This is a bit of a technical detail, but Adam Jackson and Lyude Paul has been working hard this cycle on getting what we call Server side GLVND ready for Fedora Workstation 28. Currently we are looking at enabling it either as a zero-day update or short afterwards. so what is Server Side GLVND you say? Well it is basically the last missing piece we need to enable the use of the NVidia binary driver through XWayland. Currently the NVidia driver works with Wayland native OpenGL applications, but if you are trying to run an OpenGL application requiring X we need this to support it. And to be clear once we ship this in Fedora Workstation 28 it will also require a driver update from NVidia to use it, so us shipping it is just step 1 here. We do also expect there to be some need for further tuning once we got all the pieces released to get top notch performance. Of course over time we hope and expect all applications to become Wayland native, but this is a crucial transition technology for many of our users. Of course if you are using Intel or AMD graphics with the Mesa drivers things already work great and this change will not affect you in any way.

Flatpak
Flatpaks basically already work, but we have kept focus this time around on to fleshing out the story in terms of the so called Portals. Portals are essentially how applications are meant to be able to interact with things outside of the container on your desktop. Jan Grulich has put in a lot of great effort making sure we get portal support for Qt and KDE applications, most recently by adding support for the screen capture portal on top of Pipewire. You can ready more about that on Jan Grulichs blog. He is now focusing on getting the printing portal working with Qt.

Wim Taymans has also kept going full steam ahead of PipeWire, which is critical for us to enable applications dealing with cameras and similar on your system to be containerized. More details on that in my previous blog entry talking specifically about Pipewire.

It is also worth noting that we are working with Canonical engineers to ensure Portals also works with Snappy as we want to ensure that developers have a single set of APIs to target in order to allow their applications to be sandboxed on Linux. Alexander Larsson has already reviewed quite a bit of code from the Snappy developers to that effect.

Performance work
Our engineers have spent significant time looking at various performance and memory improvements since the last release. The main credit for the recently talked about ‘memory leak’ goes to Georges Basile Stavracas Neto from Endless, but many from our engineering team helped with diagnosing that and also fixed many other smaller issues along the way. More details about the ‘memory leak’ fix in Georges blog.

We are not done here though and Alberto Ruiz is organizing a big performance focused hackfest in Cambridge, England in May. We hope to bring together many of our core engineers to work with other members of the community to look at possible improvements. The Raspberry Pi will be the main target, but of course most improvements we do to make GNOME Shell run better on a Raspberry Pi also means improvements for normal x86 systems too.

Laptop Battery life
In our efforts to make Linux even better on laptops Hans De Goede spent a lot of time figuring out things we could do to make Fedora Workstation 28 have better battery life. How valuable these changes are will of course depend on your exact hardware, but I expect more or less everyone to have a bit better battery life on Fedora Workstation 28 and for some it could be a lot better battery life. You can read a bit more about these changes in Hans de Goedes blog.